News

Minister rejects report of ALR demise

A farmer prepares his field in Delta. Debate has continued for decades about the agricultural land reserve
A farmer prepares his field in Delta. Debate has continued for decades about the agricultural land reserve's function outside B.C.'s main farming regions of the Okanagan and southwest, where development pressure is high.
— image credit: Boaz Joseph/Black Press

VICTORIA – News reports suggesting the B.C. government is considering dismantling the Agricultural Land Commission are not accurate, the minister in charge of the government's "core review" says.

A plan outlined in documents leaked to the Globe and Mail this week is "so secret that I don't even know about it myself," Energy Minister Bill Bennett said in an interview. "We're not even considering blowing up the ALC, or bringing it inside government."

Bennett said agricultural land commissioners will continue to decide on applications to amend the land reserve, established 40 years ago to protect farmland from development.

Bennett refused to comment on the suggestion that the province could be divided into two zones with different processes. But he said he is aware of many cases outside the southwestern part of B.C. where obviously unfarmable land remains locked in the reserve.

Part of the problem has been a lack of funding to the commission, Bennett said. The current budget adds $4 million to the commission's budget over three years.

"It's not all their fault, it's the way the legislation is written, it's the way their policies have developed," Bennett said. "All of those things add up to a lot of questionable decisions being made, and certainly not in areas where they have good agricultural land like Richmond and south Vancouver Island and the Fraser Valley and the Okanagan."

Bennett also rejected the suggestion that the Oil and Gas Commission would overrule the ALC on decisions in B.C.'s northeast. The OGC already has some authority on land use, and its role in the review is "tiny," he said.

NDP leader Adrian Dix accused the government of hiding its intentions before the May election.

"After commending two separate reviews that called for the ALC to be strengthened before the election, the Liberals are now conspiring to undermine it," Dix said.

Metro Vancouver mayors, facing the most pressure to expand development, expressed alarm.

"Certainly it's disturbing if they're throwing it out the window," said Pitt Meadows Mayor Deb Walters.

She said some ALR boundaries need adjustment, but beyond that, her main concerns are that the commission has been underfunded to do its job and that more effort is needed to help support the viability of farming.

"It has problems, but it has its place," Maple Ridge Mayor Ernie Daykin said of the ALR. "It protects us from ourselves."

 

We encourage an open exchange of ideas on this story's topic, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, and off-topic comments may be removed, and comment privileges revoked, per our Terms of Use. Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.

Community Events, July 2014

Add an Event

Read the latest eEdition

Browse the print edition page by page, including stories and ads.

Jul 25 edition online now. Browse the archives.