News

Proctor family protests prison move for killer of Langford teen

Murdered teen Kimberly Proctor
Murdered teen Kimberly Proctor's parents, Lucia and Fred Proctor, left, listen to Fred's sister Joanne Landolt make a statement in 2011. The family expressed outrage this week that one of Kimberly's convicted killers has been moved to a medium security institution so soon after being sent to prison.
— image credit: Sharon Tiffin/News staff

The family of Kimberly Proctor is disturbed one of her killers has been moved from a maximum to a medium security prison.

Cameron Moffat, one of two teenagers convicted of first-degree murder in the 2010 killing of the Langford teen, has been moved from Kent Institution in Agassiz to Mountain Institution next door.

"As you can imagine, we are shocked and outraged by this news," said Jo-Anne Landolt, Kimberly's aunt, in a letter to media. She expressed confusion how this could happen with a "convicted rapist, sadist, mutilator, sociopath murderer with extreme antisocial behaviour, who committed such an extremely brutal, premeditated murder."

The family's primary concern, Landolt said, is that someone who has shown no remorse for such a heinous crime appears to be moving through the system quickly. “(This) is very scary, not only for my family, but the general public, as there is always a possibility of him being released after his minimum time served."

On March 18, 2010 Moffat and friend Kruse Wellwood lured Proctor to Wellwood's family home where they raped, tortured and murdered the 18-year-old girl. They then dumped her mutilated body in a duffel bag near the Galloping Goose Trail.

Both men will be eligible for parole around 2020, after 10 years in prison. A Corrections Canada media spokesperson said the agency could not discuss individual inmates due to privacy laws.

Corrections Canada rules define a medium security prison as suitable for inmates who present a "low to moderate probability of escape and a moderate risk to the safety of the public in the event of an escape.” Such inmates are described as requiring a "moderate degree of supervision and control within the penitentiary."

These classifications are judged on the seriousness of an inmate's crime, their behaviour while in prison, "the inmate's potential for violent behaviour" and other criteria.

Wellwood remains incarcerated at Kent Institution.

kwells@goldstreamgazette.com

We encourage an open exchange of ideas on this story's topic, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, and off-topic comments may be removed, and comment privileges revoked, per our Terms of Use. Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.

Community Events, July 2014

Add an Event

Read the latest eEdition

Browse the print edition page by page, including stories and ads.

Jul 18 edition online now. Browse the archives.