Letters to the Editor

Police powers must be limited to protect the public

The editorial states: “Keep penalties as a deterrent for impaired drivers.” (Our View Dec. 7.) This suggests the CounterAttack program is working. ICBC evidence presents no such conclusion. Public Safety Minister Bond’s politically expedient report neglects to say that before the CounterAttack program there was already a 37 per cent decline in alcohol-related fatalities between 2007 and 2009.

ICBC tells us why: “Many factors affect the safety of road travel and therefore influence trends in crashes, injuries, and fatalities. Road safety cannot directly influence all aspects of crash frequency and severity (like weather, the economy, the cost of fuel, and kilometres driven),” according to the 2011 Road Safety Business Plan.

In a depression, it is known that auto deaths from all causes decline. People are driving less.

The automobile lobby is getting off scot-free. We spend billions annually subsidizing them, according to Taken for A Ride, a free online video.

Free bus service running frequently during peak inebriation times would be cheaper for society and nearly eliminate substance related deaths. And the cops could get much more paid time off to be with their families, instead of being forced to stand out in the cold.

But maybe the Roman show of bravado is what we’re really after here.

Larry Wartel

Victoria

 

 

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