Stasia Hartly and Lisa Solhjell (seated left to right) join Kerry Bowman, Hillary Kroeke, Melody Harrison, Giselle Miles, Julianne Burslem, the rest of Bayshore HealthCare’s administrative staff.

Victoria’s Bayshore HealthCare acquires Alpha Home Health

Tim Collins/News staff

When Bayshore HealthCare acquired Alpha Home Care in June of this year, area director, Stasia Hartley was expecting it would be a busy month. After all, the company had been operating in the region for more than 40 years.

The move also involved not only the transfer of Alpha’s client base, but the acquisition of the 25 care workers and two administrators who had been a part of Apha’s workforce.

But it appears that the planning of Don Swindell, Alpha’s president and second generation owner took all of that into account.

“When it came time to consider retirement, I researched home health care on the Island so could be sure our staff and patients would go forward with the best possible solution. Bayshore HealthCare was the ideal choice,” said Swindell.

The acquisition of the company had minimal impact on Alpha’s clients as they were able to maintain the same caregivers and the same attention to their health with a company that, philosophically, shared a common approach to home health care.

“Being on the private side of the business allows us to offer a level of care we’re comfortable with; a level our clients expect and deserve,” said Hartley.

“We are able to offer baths when the client wants and needs a bath and we do a little light tidying up, keeping the kitchen clean, the refrigerator free of spoiled food and the bathrooms clean. Those things all contribute to the quality of life for our clients,” she said, adding that Bayshore HealthCare workers will also prepare meals for clients, sometimes using the client’s own favorite recipes.

“These are the parts of life that can really make a difference.”

The acquisition of staff was also not nearly so difficult as Hartley imagined as Bayshore had in the past worked to assist Alpha with some staff training. As such, said Hartley, the approach and culture of the two organizations had already been pretty much aligned.

“We work really hard to make everyone, both clients and staff feel a part of the company–a part of our family–and I think the results we get are an indicator of our success in that regard,” said Hartley.

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