The Vic High grad class of 1955 at Crystal Gardens on Douglas Street during a reunion in 1985. The class is celebrating their 60th reunion this week in town.

A reunion to remember

Vic High grads from the class of 1955 are coming together for their 60th reunion tonight, with people coming from as far away as Singapore.

Irene Harrison and Maureen Moffat remember high school like it was yesterday.

The Victoria High graduates can recall the popular restaurant Terry’s, a 50s style diner on the corner of Fort and Douglas streets, where they used to hang out after every basketball game and swim meet.

“We would get 10 people into a booth and we had our soda pop and hamburgers,” laughed Harrison. “It was a regular old soda fountain.”

For Moffat, who grew up in James Bay with the self-proclaimed “James Bay Bums,” the Dallas Road Beach and the many movie theatres were hot spots for students.

“We’d swim in the winter and you’d just go out and stay out all day,” said Moffat. “We got 25 cents a week for an allowance, we’d walk to town to save the three cents each way. The movie was 15 cents so we had 10 cents to buy French fries,” said Moffat.

Harrison and Moffat, along with 70 graduates from the class of 1955, reunited at the Harbour Towers Hotel on June 10 (the day of their actual graduation ceremony) for their 60th reunion.

“There’s quite a few people who [came] that we haven’t seen in years. For some of them, it’s the first time they’ve ever come,” said Harrison. “This year because maybe they figure it will be the last big one, people really seem to be making an effort to come, which is great.”

A core group of roughly 10 grads, who have been getting together every year since the 1980s, planned this year’s milestone event.

They had people from as far away as Singapore and all over the United States and Canada return.

Stewart Smith, who finished at the top of the class out of roughly 240 students in 1955, came from New Jersey where he is a professor at Princeton University.

“It was pretty fabulous, the teachers they had in those days were really devoted and dedicated, it was a completely different world in Victoria then,” said the 77-year-old. “It was a very egalitarian place . . . I was more interested in playing rugby and lacrosse than studying.”

All three grads said they are one of the few classes that continue to meet. While no one could pinpoint why the class is so special, Smith speculated it had to do with their former principal.

“This wonderful principal Harry Smith retired that year, he’s been there for a long time, that was special for us and we had a big celebration for his retirement,” he said. “Maybe that had something to do with keeping people together.”

Other grads from that year include Jim Taylor, a sports columnist and author, and David Anderson, former Victoria MP.

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

‘Seven baths in two days’: Homeless adjusting to life in hotels

Victoria passes motion to allow camping 24-7 in parks until June 25

Income tax deadline looming

2019 individual tax returns are due June 1, June 15 for self-employed individuals

Victoria traffic stop yields drugs, case full of weapons

Police seize firearms, swords and flares

Peninsula farm stands open for business with COVID-19 restrictions

Growers hopeful shoppers will support local farms

Langford’s City Centre Park cautiously reopens most activities as of Friday

Ice rink, bowling alley and restaurant to follow new regulations

B.C. legislature coming back June 22 as COVID-19 emergency hits record

Pandemic restrictions now longer than 2017 wildfire emergency

POLL: Do you agree with the provincial government’s decision to increase the minimum wage?

B.C.’s lowest-paid workers will be getting a few more dollars to try… Continue reading

Feds delay national action plan for missing and murdered Indigenous women

Meanwhile, the pandemic has exacerbated the violence facing many Indigenous women and girls

B.C.’s essential grocery, hardware store employees should get pandemic pay: retail group

Only B.C.’s social, health and corrections workers are eligible for top-ups

COLUMN: Canada needs to remember rural communities as thoughts turn to pandemic recovery

Small towns often rely on tourism, which has been decimated by COVID-19

Edmonton, Vancouver and Toronto vying to be NHL hubs, but there’s a catch

The NHL unveiled a return-to-play plan that would feature 24 teams

As SD84 schools look to reopen, Kyuquot and Zeballos opt out

Schools in Tahsis and Gold River will open on June 1, with 30 per cent students expected to come in

B.C. sees 9 new COVID-19 cases, one death as officials watch for new cases amid Phase Two

Number of confirmed active cases is at 244, with 37 people in hospital

Illicit-drug deaths up in B.C. and remain highest in Canada: chief coroner

More than 4,700 people have died of overdoses since B.C. declared a public health emergency in early 2016

Most Read