Katherine Engqvist in the Kidepo Valley National Park in Uganda. Engqvist has been named to Editor & Publisher Magazine’s 25 Under 35. (Photo courtesy Katherine Engqvist)

Katherine Engqvist in the Kidepo Valley National Park in Uganda. Engqvist has been named to Editor & Publisher Magazine’s 25 Under 35. (Photo courtesy Katherine Engqvist)

Black Press Media Victoria editor recognized as rising star in industry

Katherine Engqvist named to Editor & Publisher Magazine’s 25 Under 35

Black Press Media’s Greater Victoria bureau chief has been recognized as one of the rising stars in the news industry.

Katherine Engqvist has earned a spot in Editor & Publisher Magazine’s 25 Under 35.

“This year’s list of 25 Under 35 showcases a wide range of skills and talents taking place in newsrooms around the world,” according to the article from Editor & Publisher. “They’re pushing the industry forward with diverse ideas, creative innovation and intelligent vision. Our future is better because of it.”

ALSO READ: ‘Be Ready’ feature garners award nomination for Black Press Media’s Greater Victoria team

Engqvist graduated with a bachelor of journalism from Ryerson University, joining Black Press Media at the Goldstream News Gazette in June 2015 before taking over as Greater Victoria bureau chief in September 2018.

Engqvist shares advice for other young professionals in the news industry.

“Never stop learning,” she said. “The journalism industry is always evolving and as a journalist you will need to keep up. You’ll push your comfort zone and put your skills to the test so be prepared — that’s the beauty of this industry. No two days are alike and every interview will be different. Some days will be tough but others will be unforgettable and you will grow in ways you never imagined.”

ALSO READ: Black Press Media wins preeminent journalism award for opioid crisis series

Engqvist is optimistic the Canadian news industry will continue to thrive over the next decade.

“Readers are looking for stories they can’t get from the wire or read anywhere else. They want to connect with their neighbours, learn more about the business owner down the street or find out if their local tax dollars are being misspent.”

She says technology and social media may have transformed the way news is delivered, but not with how readers are engaged.

”Compelling human interest stories and hyper-local breaking news will continue to drive readership on all platforms, whether that’s in print, online or on a new platform that hasn’t been invented yet. “

vnc.editorial@blackpress.ca


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