Saanich’s Rutledge Park is one of the busiest for Trick-or-Treaters, according to the Trick-or-Treat density map that uses 2016 Canadian census data. (Censusmapper.ca)

Saanich’s Rutledge Park is one of the busiest for Trick-or-Treaters, according to the Trick-or-Treat density map that uses 2016 Canadian census data. (Censusmapper.ca)

Candy calculator: Map estimates number of trick or treaters

Use the online Halloween trick-or-treat app

It’s Halloween, the busiest time of year for neighbourhood foot traffic.

So just how many trick-or-treaters can you expect? Obviously, it depends on how big of a treat you give out (everybody remembers the house that gives out regular sized candy bars).

But other than that, the best tool for the job is the Trick-or-Treat Onslaught at CensusMapper.ca.

Read More: The Fernwood Halloween bonfire is back

Made by a pair of GIS spatial academics Alejandro Cervantes and Jens von Bergmann, CensusMapper.ca taps into Canada’s 2016 census data to generate the Trick-or-Treat Onslaught, which calculates the number of trick-or-treat aged children per square kilometre.

The app marks children aged three through 14 as being of trick-or-treat age, and in Greater Victoria the densest neighbourhoods for trick-or-treating include the Colquitz, Glanford and Gordon Head areas of Saanich, as well as Vic West and the Camosun Jubilee area of Saanich-Oak Bay.

The western half of Quadra Village, for example, has 35 trick-or-treaters under the age of five and 160 between the ages of five and 14. Granted, the data is now two years old, but the numbers are likely the same.

CensusMapper.ca also provides a suggestive Trick-or-Treat density map to find the best trick-or-treating neighbourhoods and also has a Canada haunted houses app that gauges “dwellings not occupied by usual residents.”

reporter@saanichnews.com


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Halloween