Exposure to Wi-Fi examined at Sooke Awareness Film Night

Generation Zapped investigates potential effects of wireless technology

Children and teenagers are vulnerable, but we are all exposed to Wi-Fi radiation that is emitted during everyday use of tablets, cellphones, laptops and wireless routers at home and in classrooms, offices and businesses.

On Dec. 13, Awareness Film Night presents the newly-released film Generation Zapped which investigates the potential effects of wireless technology on our health and well-being as well as on the physical and emotional development of children.

Generation Zapped brings together Canadian and international experts, including a brain development researcher, oncologists, a pediatric neurologist, public health specialists and a pediatric cancer researcher speaking out about the growing mountain of scientific evidence on the health, developmental and social effects of prolonged exposure to wireless technology.

“As a mother of teenagers, I am concerned with the shadow side of wireless technology on our children, the increased health risks and how it is sociologically impacting children’s development and behavior,” said filmmaker Sabine El Gemayel

“I love technology and the many conveniences it has offered us, yet I believe that increased transparency is vital. I invite audiences to consider the case for honouring the precautionary principle: slow down, turn it off at night and plug it in.”

Being aware of these dangers could be unsettling to those of us who, likewise, are lovers of technology, but Generation Zapped also provides hope by suggesting simple how-to guidelines for protecting and safeguarding ourselves and our families from these potentially accumulative

Protecting and safeguarding will also be the focus of a post-screening question-and-answer with Katharina Gustav.

Gustav believes that electromagnetic fields matter. After performing hundreds of EMF and RF radiation assessments and with her background in environmental and occupational health, building biology and nutrition, she knows that even small changes can have major positive effects, and she develops strategies on how to measurably reduce exposure.

Gustav recently translated the EMF Guideline for the Prevention, Diagnosis and Treatment of EMF-related Health Problems and Illnesses by the European Academy for Environmental Medicine.

The film night will be held at the EMCS theatre. The movie starts at 7 p.m., but Gustav will be there early to answer questions prior to the film, as well as leading the post-screening discussion and answering questions raised after seeing the film. Admission is by donation.

For more information, please go online to www.awarenessfilmnight.ca. Please consider bringing a food item for the EMCS students’ 10,000 Tonight drive for the Sooke Food Bank being held on the same evening.

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