The Nature Conservancy of Canada says giving someone a wolf (or moose, or bear) is a great way to relieve the pressure of gift shopping on yourself and the environment. Photo courtesy the Nature Conservancy.

Give the gift of nature this holiday season

Please don’t be mad, but I bought you a moose

As Canadians prepare for the holiday season, the Nature Conservancy of Canada wants to help relieve the pressure and stress of gift-giving, on ourselves and the environment.

Canada’s leading not-for-profit, private land conservation organization is offering its 24th annual Gifts of Canadian Nature for the holiday season. Through this alternative green gift-giving program, people can symbolically adopt Canadian wildlife or landscapes.

The conservancy has been working to protect lands and water since 1962. With habitat loss continuing to be a major environmental threat to Canada’s natural treasures, funds raised through Gifts of Canadian Nature will help protect important wetlands, forests, coastal areas and grasslands.

In addition to symbolically adopting a piece from a diverse range of Canadian landscapes, people can also show their support for some of Canada’s iconic species. These include moose, polar bear, narwhal, Atlantic puffin, swift fox, wolverine, plains bison and more.

For people wanting to support conservation in BC, gift-givers can choose land in the Rockies, the Interior grasslands or on the west coast. The wildlife “gifts” that are found in BC are grizzly bear, bald eagle, monarch butterfly, snowy owl, Canada lynx, wolverine, wolf and American badger.

“Gifts of Canadian Nature are practical for people who have friends and loved ones who enjoy nature or the outdoors,” said Jessica Panetta, national media relations manager with NCC. “Additionally, these ideas are handy for those on your shopping list who have everything or are difficult to buy for. Here is a way for people to give and receive unique, memorable and impactful gifts. You can avoid mall lineups, buy local and help us care for our natural spaces and wildlife.”

Over the past 24 years, more than $3 million has been raised through this holiday program to help NCC continue its conservation work across the country.

Charitable tax receipts are issued for all gift purchases. Gift recipients will receive a full-colour certificate, a 2019 NCC wall calendar showcasing Canadian landscapes, and a wildlife booklet about the symbolically adopted species. Paperless gift options are also available, in which case the recipients will receive an e-certificate.

More information can be found at giftsofnature.ca or by calling toll-free 1-800-465-8005.

The Nature Conservancy was recently given top marks in the annual MoneySense Charity 100 report card, evaluating Canadian evaluated Canadian charities for their overall efficiency, fundraising efficiency and social transparency. The conservancy was named the top environmental charity in the country with an overall grade of A+.


Steve Kidd
Senior reporter, Penticton Western News
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