Hundreds of Oak Bay citizens and members of the Songhees and Esquimalt Nations witnessed the raising of the Sno’uyutth Pole in November 2015. (Black Press file photo)

Hundreds of Oak Bay citizens and members of the Songhees and Esquimalt Nations witnessed the raising of the Sno’uyutth Pole in November 2015. (Black Press file photo)

Good energy marks third annual celebration of welcome pole

Nov. 22 is Sno’uyutth day in Oak Bay with good energy at Windsor Park beginning at 7 p.m.

Thursday marks the third annual Sno’uyutth Day in Oak Bay.

The 20-foot cedar pole in front of Oak Bay Secondary School was designed by Songhees artist Butch Dick and was carved by his son Clarence Dick. Hundreds of Oak Bay citizens and members of the Songhees and Esquimalt Nations witnessed the raising of the Sno’uyutth pole in November 2015. Sno’uyutth means “spreading good energy” in Lekwungen, the traditional language of the Songhees and Esquimalt Nations.

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Mayor Kevin Murdock proclaimed Nov. 22 Sno’uyutth day in Oak Bay, and there will be lots of good energy at Windsor Park beginning at 7 p.m. with participation by the Lekwungen Dancers, a group that also includes singers and drummers. The Oaks Restaurant offers traditional bannock and Florence Dick, First Nations liaison for the Songhees Nation will also launch a discussion of the importance of the Sno’uyutth pole in the process of reconciliation between Oak Bay and the Songhees and Esquimalt Nations. The public is invited to come to this free event, and it will be an exciting and memorable celebration of dialogue and discussion, music and dancing, and tea and bannock.



c.vanreeuwyk@blackpress.ca

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