Riffington Manor receives a treatment of snow for the film production of Hallmark’s “Christmas Bells Are Ringing.” (Keri Coles/News Staff)

Riffington Manor receives a treatment of snow for the film production of Hallmark’s “Christmas Bells Are Ringing.” (Keri Coles/News Staff)

Local charity benefits from Hallmark movie filming in Oak Bay

Fees from renting prominent Uplands home donated to Victoria Hospice

Christmas bells are ringing early this year, as rental fees from a Hallmark movie being filmed in Oak Bay, are being donated to a local charity.

Riffington Manor, a prominent home in Uplands, is abustle this week as a film crew shoots the Hallmark Christmas movie, “Christmas Bells Are Ringing,” starring Emilie Ullerup of Chesapeake Shores and Josh Kelly of UnREAL. Artificial snow was added to the exterior of the home to transform it into the Cape Cod property where the story is set.

Ullerup plays a photographer returning to Cape Cod for the first time in years to celebrate Christmas and her father’s wedding. Anxious to revisit past memories, she finds new meaning in her photography, and falls in love with the character played by Kelly.

The movie is being filmed around Greater Victoria – with stops at the Sidney Pier, the Union Club, and a house on Victoria Ave. – and is scheduled to premiere on Hallmark Movies & Mysteries on Dec. 23.

The location fees collected for renting out Riffington Manor are being donated by the homeowner to Victoria Hospice, a not-for-profit that provides end-of-life care focused on palliative treatment.

Victoria Hospice gets half of their annual funding from the donations of the community.

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Victoria Hospice

Victoria Hospice is a not-for-profit with a mission to “enhance the quality of life for those facing advancing illness, death and bereavement, through skilled and compassionate care, education, research and advocacy.”

Donations help to provide the very best possible round-the-clock care, support, and pain and symptom management for patients nearing end-of-life, whether at home, in the community or at the Inpatient unit. Community donations support all Victoria Hospice services and programs that are not funded through the health care system, including counselling, spiritual care, bereavement services, volunteer coordination and training, and a significant portion of the Palliative Response Team.

Last year, more than 7,000 individuals contributed by way of one-time, monthly, or annual donations, sponsorships, grants, special events, and legacy gifts.

Another way to give is by volunteering. Nearly 300 volunteers play an essential role at Victoria Hospice, supporting the programs and services and ensuring patients and families receive quality end-of-life care.


 

keri.coles@oakbaynews.com

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