Emily Carr House, where the Canadian artist lived as a child, is one of the stops on the James Bay tour put on by the Architectural Institute of British Columbia. Photo contributed

Summer walking tours explore Victoria’s architectural history

Expert guides shed light on the histories of Chinatown, Fort Victoria and James Bay

Those twinkling lights that illuminate Trounce Alley – did you know they are over 125 years old?

The Architectural Institute of British Columbia wants to share all the fun facts it has about three of Victoria’s oldest and most charming neighbourhoods, with a series of walking tours through July and August.

“The tours are designed to engage and educate participants about the value of architecture and its integral role within society, in a fun and social setting,” says Institute CEO Mark Vernon.

The tours wind through Chinatown, James Bay and the original site of Fort Victoria downtown, each shedding light on the unique architectural perspectives in those neighbourhoods. Expert guides will provide key insight into some of the city’s most iconic buildings and landmarks like Fan Tan Alley, Market Square and the fort walls along Government Street.

The walking tours are open to locals and tourists alike, who can inspect examples of 1880s architecture and explore the development of Victoria.

The tours cost $10 and kick off this Saturday (July 7). They run weekends at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. and space is limited, so if you’re interested visit aibc.ca/tours to book a reservation.

editor@vicnews.com

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