Vic High prom, grad time a cause for reflection

The months, years go by ‘so fast’ for Vic High students

Vic High’s busy 2012 valedictorians

As parents of school-aged children can attest, spring is often a busy time of year.

Try being a student in Grade 12, attempting to find a balance between numerous activities and end-of-term schoolwork.

Then throw organizing your class’ grad activities into the mix.

“May has been a blink,” says Jessica Dillon, Vic High’s co-valedictorian with fellow student Noah Spriggs. “June is going to go by so fast. I’m looking forward to a slow summer.”

Dillon has played a leadership role on the school’s grad committee, in a year where students have picked up the organizational slack due to teacher job action.

“We’ve been off-our-feet busy,” she says.

To help reduce the costs to students for tonight’s (June 1) grad dinner-dance, Dillon and her nine fellow crew members organized several fundraisers – with just 13 days of planning.

After purposely lowballing their fundraising goals on each event, but maximizing their efforts, they shattered their objectives and brought in $5,000.

That level of leadership is something of which Grade 12 students have plenty of opportunities to take advantage, she says.

“The last six to eight months have showed how rewarding it can be to see things through and watch (your efforts) produce.”

Being a leader comes in many forms, Spriggs says.

“You don’t have to take a leadership role to help out,” he says, noting that the grad-related events needed many hands.

“Somebody obviously has to do it, (but) it kind of depends on how much initiative you have. You can still absolutely be involved without having all the pressure.”

Reflecting on their school lives was part of working on their speech, Spriggs says.

“Me and Jessica were joking about how everyone kind of went through the dark middle-school years,” he says.

“So much change has happened. I’m just thinking back to how I was even a couple years ago – it’s hard to explain, it’s such a different feel. Even just this year, being in Grade 12, it really kind of does something to you, you’re right at the top and you’re like a role model, and that kind of motivated me to get involved in things.”

For Vic High newcomers – or those entering their senior years – looking to make the most of their time at school, both of these young leaders encourage students to try new activities and courses.

For Spriggs it was dance, rugby and theatre – he just finished a five-show run of A Chorus Line, this year’s spring musical – in addition to his heavy academic course load.

Outside of school he’s involved in gymnastics, both as an athlete and a coach, and is on the Victoria Youth Council.

Dillon, who works every day after school, was also in dance and found herself taking an automotive class this year after buying her first car. “I really enjoyed it,” she says. “I wish I would have taken it earlier.”

Spriggs plans to attend the University of Victoria in the fall for health information technology and computer science. While he envisions one day building a career in another city, for now he’s glad to be staying put.

“I love Victoria. I’m so happy to stay here, and so many of my friends are staying here. To have the solid group I have will really help me next year.”

While she’ll be busy at Camosun College this fall in the social work program, Dillon says she’s going to miss the welcoming, comfortable atmosphere of Vic High.

That scenario contributed to many students transferring there from other schools in the Greater Victoria district, she says. Some of them will be among the 194 students taking part in grad ceremonies next Tuesday at UVic.

Final exams loom after that, but as Dillon says, June will slide by, especially for students saying goodbye to their grade-school days.

editor@vicnews.com

Honouring Japanese Canadians

• Five Japanese-Canadian students who missed their 1942 graduation due to the Canadian government’s internment program during the Second World War will be honoured Tuesday (June 5) during the Vic High grad ceremony at the University of Victoria.

• Among those recognized will be 88-year-old Yoshio “Yon” Shimizu of Wallaceburg, Ont., who cannot attend due to poor health. His diploma and a letter from Education Minister George Abbott will be presented to Tom Halbert, a friend and classmate of Shimizu. The ceremony begins at 7 p.m. in the Farquhar Auditorium.

Just Posted

420 celebrations turn over new leaf at B.C. legislature

Cannabis is legal for the first time in the 21-year existence of the 420 event in Victoria

VIDEO: ‘Stewie the Starfish’ mascot revealed at Premier League kickoff party

Pacific FC kickoff party scores in Victoria Inner Harbour

Big Brothers Big Sisters’ Bowl for Kids’ Sake returns to Langford

Annual fundraising event held from April 26 to 28

Report calls on Saanich to expand multicultural programming at recreation facilities

Report also notes that Saanich could do more for sexual minorities.

WATCH: Movie star and PACE alum Calum Worthy talks musical theatre and his career

“American Vandal” and “Austin and Ally” actor has been returning to the program for over 20 years

POLL: How often does your family use BC Ferries?

Navigating the lineups for BC Ferries is a way of life for… Continue reading

Crime Stoppers most wanted for Greater Victoria for the week of April 16

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

Deck collapses in Langley during celebration, 35 people injured

Emergency responders rushed to the Langley home

B.C. mom wages battle to get back four kids taken from her in Egypt

Sara Lessing of Mission has help from Abbotsford law firm

VIDEO: Fire guts Peachland home

Crews are still on scene pumping water onto the blaze in the Okanagan neighbourhood

$6K raised in one day’s time for family of woman gunned down in Penticton

GoFundMe launched for family of Darlene Knippelberg, to pay for funeral costs and other expenses

B.C. mountain biker sent home from hospital twice, despite broken vertebrae

Released in Maple Ridge to go home with three fractured vertebrae

Seven tips to travel safely this Easter long weekend

An average of three people are killed, and hundreds more injured, each Easter long weekend in B.C.

Most Read