Editorial: Be careful what you wish for

In politics, things take much longer to happen than you think they will, and then they happen much faster than you thought they would.

New Democratic Premier John Horgan would do well to remember this line borrowed from the late German economist Rudi Dornbush.

The New Democrats certainly know a thing or two about waiting. Since their emergence as a modern-era party in the early 1960s, they have had few and far between opportunities to govern. This present turn is their third after 16 years in the political wilderness.

This exile dates back to 2001, the last year of a 10-year-tenure in office that had started with so much promise, only to end with the near extinction of the party following years of silly shanigians and genuine scandals that dearly cost B.C. in both reputation and revenue.

This ‘lost decade’ still hung over the New Democrats as they sought to unseat the B.C. Liberals in this year’s provincial election and its muddled outcome speaks to the weary memories of voters: they were itching for change, but unwilling to invest the New Democrats with the full range of powers and spoils that the Westminster system offers.

Accordingly, they placed New Democrats in the probationary limbo of a minority government with Andrew Weaver as their political parole officer. He, and only he, will ultimately determine the fate of the cabinet members that swore their office oaths Tuesday and it must surely rankle some old faithfuls that this rare moment of triumph came courtesy of an ideological movement, with which the last NDP government once warred in the woods of Clayoquot Sound.

This said, critics of the government do themselves an intellectual disservice by questioning its legitimacy. It came to power fair and square following a vote of non-confidence and deserves every chance to try its hand. But its margin for mistakes is small. Raging wildfires across this government are already testing this government and other threats to the existing order are already approaching quickly.

Just Posted

WATCH: Moms Stop The Harm respond to opioid crisis

Someone asked her if she does the work for her son. McBain said: “No, actually. I do it for your son.”

Man arrested at gunpoint outside Vic High

Police were called after he allegedly threatened a teacher with a knife

Skydiver lands safely after cutting away main chute

Central Saanich emergency services called after witnesses saw spiralling chute

Man struck and killed on the Pat Bay Highway

Pedestrian struck while crossing near Mount Newton X Rd in Central Saanich

VicPD cuts school liaison program over budget impasse with Esquimalt

Six officers, including three school liaisons, to be reassigned to frontline duties

VIDEO: B.C. ‘escapologist’ stuns judges on Britain’s Got Talent

Matt Johnson says televised water stunt was closest he’s come to death

Charges follow collisions between pickup and police vehicles in Nanaimo

Majore Jackson, 32, and Andrew John Bellwood, 47, from Nanaimo, face numerous charges

Been a long day? Here’s cute puppies in training

Group is training next batch of assistance dogs at Vancouver International Airport

78 Mexican farmworkers displaced after fire tears through building on B.C. farm

Flames broke out Thursday morning in building that housed up to 80 workers at Abbotsford farm

Cartoonist captures public mood following Toronto, Humboldt tragedies

Cartoonist said he was trying to find a bit of positivity with an image that has garnered attention

Whitecaps host against Real Salt Lake looking to snap 3-game losing streak

Ending their losing streak is all the Whitecaps care about when they host Salt Lake in Vancouver

Montreal Habs goalie Carey Price stops by B.C. hometown for rodeo

Famous goaltender tries to blend in with the crowd at first BCRA-santioned event of the season

B.C. hires 20 more conservation officers

The province announces 12 new locations for conservation officer services this year

Most Read