Founding member Andy Powell of Wishbone Ash joins his bandmates at the Mary Winspear Centre’s Charlie White Theatre on Sept. 22. wishboneash.com

Bluesy autumn in store at the Mary Winspear Centre

Varied offerings this month, from 1970s rockers Wishbone Ash to spoken word artist Shayne Koyczan

If cooling temperatures and leaves falling make you feel blue, let the upcoming artists at Sidney’s Mary Winspear Centre stoke a fire this month. From England to Salt Spring to Penticton, these artists can warm the ears, eyes and hearts as the days begin to chill.

Pioneering 70’s English rockers Wishbone Ash set their sights on the centre’s Charlie White Theatre for a Sept. 22 concert. Founding member Andy Powell and bandmates Mark Abrahams, Bob Skeat and Joe Crabtree shred hits from their albums Argus, Blue Horizon, the stripped-down Bare Bones and others, as part of their North American Open Road tour.

Forty-plus years of touring has taken the band into prog-rock, blues and other styles, all with the bass line’s steady heartbeat. The rollicking night begins with Juno-nominated blues veteran and Nanaimo resident David Gogo. Tickets are $49.50.

The blues continue onto Sept. 23, with a bit of a twist, when the mesmerizing Harry Manx billows out his blend of blues and Indian music known as “Mystissippi Blues.”

Shadowing the Indian musician Vishwa Mohan Bhatt and working in Toronto’s blues scene, he honed a rich blend of his two experiences – known as “Blues with Ragas.” The Salt Spring Islander sways the pendulum towards the West in collaboration with Victoria’s Emily Carr String Quartet for a luscious, local night. Tickets go for $50.40.

A different kind of blues wraps up the month at the Winspear on Saturday, Sept. 29, when spoken-word superstar Shane Koyczan casts his spell. Tales of addiction, resilience, bullying, kindness and wonder flow from his lips and have illuminated audiences around the globe.

The 42-year-old wordsmith brings his bold, breathtaking prose across B.C. with a delivery to stir the heartstrings and raise the spirit. Tickets go for $35.

For tickets to any of these events or to find more information, visit marywinspear.ca.

– Monday Magazine staff

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