Alex Judd plays John Proctor and Sarah Newton plays Abigail in Langham Court Theatre’s version of The Crucible.

Langham Court takes on humanity, witchcraft in play

Humanity and the ability for a community to tear itself apart in the name of what they believe in are at the forefront of a new drama.

Humanity, witchcraft and the ability for a community to tear itself apart in the name of what they believe in are at the forefront of a new drama at Langham Court Theatre.

The Crucible, originally written by Arthur Miller in 1953, tells the story of the Salem witch trials that took place in the Massachusetts Bay Colony between 1692 and 1693.

The Tony-award-winning drama begins with several young girls and a slave playing in the woods, attempting to conjure spirits from the dead. After they’re caught, rather than suffering punishment for their actions, the girls accuse other people in Salem of practicing witchcraft, which results in mass paranoia and an atmosphere of fear in which everyone is a potential witch.

While the play has been recreated by many community theatres, director David MacPherson gives speaking roles to 18 of the 27-person cast, trying to give voice to the women in the play, many of whom are servants or wives, whom expected to stay silent.

“Here’s this unfortunate opportunity for them to take this power and strike back at some of the people who have oppressed them and kept them from a life that’s worthy and rewarding,” said MacPherson, who has been involved with 14 plays at Langham.

“When (the women) behave in this way, they’re doing it not because they’re malicious and evil, but because they’ve never had any opportunity to exercise power in their lives.”

Alex Judd plays farmer John Proctor, who is faced with a dilemma throughout the course of the play after he has an affair with his servant, Abigail.

“Proctor is trying to forgive himself but not realizing that’s what he’s doing with his wife and continuing through the pain of having broken the trust with this wife, keeps returning to Abigail in an almost habitual, addictive way,” Judd said.

At the time, Miller wrote the play as an allegory of McCarthyism, when the U.S. government ostracized people for being communists. However, Judd and MacPherson agreed the play has some stark similarities to the election of incoming U.S. president Donald Trump.

“(The play) is a statement about how ideology can lead to a society in which people become targeted and oppressed with very little evidence, with very little actual research and understanding of what’s going on and are victimized,” MacPherson said, adding there was a lot of ideology and racism wrapped up in the recent election.

“It’s a judging of people based on fear and that’s exactly what The Crucible is about. It’s the fact that the system is set up to perpetuate fear, violence, hatred and in the end, inaccurate perception of what’s going on in the world.”

The Crucible runs until Dec. 3 at Langham Court Theatre (805 Langham Crt.) For more information or tickets visit langhamtheatre.ca or call the box office at 250-384-2142.

 

 

Just Posted

Art takes a personal tone during the 110th anniversary of the Victoria Sketch Club

The 47th annual art show is taking place until March 24

CRD’s 2019 financial plan includes 23 per cent increase for capital projects

Housing, health care and wastewater projects included in 2019 plan

How a scrawny kid from Oak Bay bulked into one of rugby sevens’ best

Doing it for Dylan, Oak Bay’s Connor Braid at the top of his game

Victoria Mayor Lisa Helps hires new chief of staff

Alison James will take over as head of strategy and operations on April 23

After mosque attacks, New Zealand bans ‘military-style’ guns

The gunman killed 50 in a Christchurch mosque

Greater Victoria Wanted List for the week of March 19

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

POLL: When do you think the next major earthquake will hit Vancouver Island?

According to seismologists, Vancouver Island is overdue for a magnitude 7 earthquake.… Continue reading

Nitro Cold Brew Coffee from B.C. roaster recalled due to botulism scare

“If you purchased N7 Nitro Cold Brew Coffee from Cherry Hill … do not drink it.”

Short list for new gnome home includes Parksville, Coombs

Five potential locations have been chosen by Howard’s owners who will decide Tuesday

B.C. man gets award for thwarting theft, sexual assault – all in 10 minutes

Karl Dey helped the VPD take down a violent sex offender

Baby left alone in vehicle in Walmart parking lot

Williams Lake RCMP issue warning after attending complaint at Walmart Wednesday

Nowhere to grieve: How homeless people deal with loss during the opioid crisis

Abbotsford homeless advocate says grief has distinct challenges for those living on the streets

Most Read