Actors Dan Levy, left, and Emily Hampshire, stars of “Schitt’s Creek,” pose in Toronto on Monday, November 23, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darren Calabrese

Actors Dan Levy, left, and Emily Hampshire, stars of “Schitt’s Creek,” pose in Toronto on Monday, November 23, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darren Calabrese

VIDEO: ‘Schitt’s Creek’ stars on emotional end to beloved Canadian comedy

CBC comedy about the formerly wealthy Rose family has become an international sensation

Daniel Levy couldn’t stop the tide of emotions.

Even though the “Schitt’s Creek” star and co-creator had always known how the show would end, and he was the one who decided to wrap it up for good at the end of its imminent sixth season, he still had conflicted feelings while filming it this past summer.

“I feel like we have our best season yet, and it’s always good to go out knowing that, but at the same time it’s really sad,” Levy, who is also the showrunner, said in an on-set interview in the tiny hamlet of Goodwood, Ont.

“Saying goodbye to all these places we’ve come to know and love, and people we’ve come to call friends and family, is a very melancholic thing. But I guess if you’re feeling a lot, it means you’ve done something right.”

To say “Schitt’s Creek” has been a Canadian success story would be an understatement.

Since its debut in January 2015, the CBC comedy about the formerly wealthy Rose family has become an international sensation, racking up legions of fans and getting raves in major publications.

Then there are the nominations for major honours including the Emmys, Screen Actors Guild Awards, Canadian Screen Awards, and Critics Choice Awards.

Levy co-created the series with his Canadian comedy-star dad, Eugene Levy, who plays sensible patriarch and former video store magnate Johnny Rose.

Fellow Canadian comedy great Catherine O’Hara plays eccentric matriarch and former soap star Moira Rose, who has amassed a particularly fervent fan base with her dramatic diction, outlandish wardrobe and precious collection of wigs.

Daniel Levy portrays their fashionable entrepreneur son, David, and Annie Murphy plays their budding public-relations-pro daughter, Alexis.

Together they live in a motel Johnny helps run with owner Stevie (Emily Hampshire) in Schitt’s Creek, a small town Johnny once bought as a joke.

“Fortunately people are very upset, so that’s a good thing,” Levy said with a laugh of his decision to conclude the story at the end of season 6, which debuts Jan. 7.

“But our fans have always been incredibly understanding and respectful, and I think they get why we’re doing it. I would never want to compromise in any way the quality of the show, because I respect the fans so much and because I respect the time they’ve put into watching the show and supporting the show.

“So it’s bittersweet, for sure, but I feel good about how it’s all coming to an end.”

The path to that end seems to be a wedding aisle.

WATCH: Ontario town draws fans as backdrop of ‘Schitt’s Creek’

Last season David got engaged to his boyfriend/boutique shop business partner, Patrick, played by Noah Reid. And a season 6 teaser trailer shows the main characters dressed to the nines outside the motel at sunset, seemingly celebrating a big event, possibly their nuptials.

The final day of shooting “was a weepy day,” said Murphy.

“I fear that it’s just going to be us as people crying on camera, as opposed to us in character crying in the scene.”

Reid said cast members couldn’t make eye contact with each other, for fear of bursting into tears.

“I spent a lot of time looking at the ground that day,” he said.

Before filming ended, Murphy stocked up on butter tarts from Annina’s Bakeshop, which is across the street from the show’s set and is a local staple in Goodwood. And she kept a memento from set: Alexis’s college diploma, which was featured in an episode and has a typo saying she majored in “marketing and pubic relations.”

Reid has a stash of products he and Daniel Levy took on the last day at the Rose Apothecary, the store David and Patrick ran together.

“Dan and I just went shopping in our own store, which was delightful,” he said. ”There was nobody in there, the camera crew was outside shooting an exterior and we were literally just walking around picking things off of shelves.”

The cast sang karaoke at the wrap party.

“I had the distinct pleasure that night of singing George Jones’ ‘A Good Year for the Roses’ with Mary Margaret O’Hara. It was truly a lifetime moment for me,” Reid said, referring to O’Hara’s singer-songwriter sister.

“I always do Backstreet Boys and then sometimes I scream-sing ‘You Oughta Know’ (by Alanis Morissette), which everyone enjoys,” quipped Murphy.

When “Schitt’s Creek” is done for good, Reid plans to pursue his music career. Murphy plans to find gigs in Los Angeles.

Daniel Levy will also be in L.A., working under a three-year overall deal with ABC Studios to develop and produce scripted projects.

“I think all we’re trying to do with this last season is continue to tell funny and compelling and lovely stories about these people,” said Levy, “and continue to reveal sides of them that the audiences have never seen before, while at the same time wrapping things up in a way that feels respectful to the characters and to the expectations of the audience and hoping to find a happy medium between the two.

“And just going out with a bang and really giving it our all.”

Victoria Ahearn, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Saanich police Chief Constable Scott Green (right) stands with Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers program coordinators Phil Downie and Gill Millam who received a Crime Stoppers International award for their work in 2019. (Photo courtesy of the Saanich Police Department)
West Shore RCMP say a large dog is in the ownership of CRD Animal Control after it attacked a Langford mother and her child near Glen Lake on Nov. 19. (Black Press Media file photo)
Large dog attacks mother and child in Langford

Police say dog in ownership of CRD Animal Control

Victoria School for Ideal Education at 2820 Belmont Avenue is the second school in Greater Victoria with an active confirmed COVID-19 exposure. (Travis Paterson/News Staff)
Private school becomes second Greater Victoria school with COVID-19 exposure

Victoria School for Ideal Education follows Lakeview Christian School in Saanich

Brenda Schroeder thought she was reading it wrong when she won $100,000 from a Season’s Greetings Scratch & Win. (Courtesy BCLC)
New home on the agenda after scratch ticket win in Saanich

Victoria woman set to share her $100,000 Season’s Greetings lottery win

B.C. NDP Leader John Horgan votes at Luxton Hall during advance polls for the provincial election in Langford, B.C., Monday, Oct. 19, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
2020 provincial election sets historical low turnout

Just over 1.9 million registered voters cast ballots in 2020

Kyle Charles poses for a photo in Edmonton on Friday, Nov. 20, 2020. Marvel Entertainment, the biggest comic book publisher in the world, hired the 34-year-old First Nations illustrator as one of the artists involved in Marvel Voice: Indigenous Voices #1 in August. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson
VIDEO: Indigenous illustrator of new Marvel comic hopes Aboriginal women feel inspired

Kyle Charles says Indigenous women around the world have reached out

B.C. Liberal MLA Shirley Bond questions NDP government ministers in the B.C. legislature, Feb. 19, 2020. (Hansard TV)
Cabinet veteran Shirley Bond chosen interim leader of B.C. Liberals

28-member opposition prepares for December legislature session

Motorists wait to enter a Fraser Health COVID-19 testing facility, in Surrey, B.C., on Monday, November 9, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
COVID-19: What do rising positivity rates mean for B.C.? It’s not entirely clear

Coronavirus cases are on the rise but the province has not unveiled clear thresholds for further measures

A rider carves a path on Yanks Peak Saturday, Nov. 21. Two men from Prince George went missing on the mountain the next day. One of them, Colin Jalbert, made it back after digging out his sled from four feet under the snow. The other, Mike Harbak, is still missing. Local search and rescue teams went out looking Monday, Nov. 23. (Sam Fait Photo)
‘I could still be the one out there’: Snowmobiler rescued, 1 missing on northern B.C. mountain

As Quesnel search and rescue teams search for the remaining rider, Colin Jalbert is resting at home

More than 70 anglers participated in the bar-fishing demonstration fishery on Sept. 9, 2020 on the Fraser River near Chilliwack. DFO officers ticketed six people and seized four rods. A court date is set for Dec. 1, 2020. (Jennifer Feinberg/ Chilliwack Progress file)
Anglers ticketed in Fraser River demonstration fishery heading to court

Sportfishing groups started a GoFundMe with almost $20K so far for legal defence of six anglers

Care home staff are diligent about wearing personal protective equipment when they are in contact with residents, but less so when they interact with other staff members, B.C. Seniors Advocate says. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young
More COVID-19 testing needed for senior home staff, B.C.’s advocate says

Employees mingling spotted as virus conductor in many workplaces

This 2019 photo provided by The ALS Association shows Pat Quinn. Quinn, a co-founder of the viral ice bucket challenge, died Sunday, Nov. 22, 2020, at the age of 37. (Scott Kauffman/The ALS Association via AP)
Co-founder of viral ALS Ice Bucket Challenge dies at 37

Pat Quinn was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig’s disease, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, in 2013

Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada David Lametti speaks with the media following party caucus in Ottawa, Tuesday, January 28, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Exclusion of mental health as grounds for assisted death is likely temporary: Lametti

Senators also suggested the exclusion renders the bill unconstitutional

Most Read