‘Roundabout’ by Janis Woode, a brass and steel sculpture with wrapped copper wire that’s 10.5 by 4.25 by 26 inches in size. The work is showing at The Avenue Gallery in Oak Bay this month. (Janis Woode Image)

‘Roundabout’ by Janis Woode, a brass and steel sculpture with wrapped copper wire that’s 10.5 by 4.25 by 26 inches in size. The work is showing at The Avenue Gallery in Oak Bay this month. (Janis Woode Image)

Sculpting the common thread among us

At the Galleries in Greater Victoria for February

A career in health care seeps through in the sculptures of Janis Woode.

“It gives my a special insight into the human experience,” said the artist, whose works are on display at The Avenue Gallery in Oak Bay, Feb. 2 to 9.

“My hope is that my sculpture draws a common thread for the viewer, a thread that ties us together as people no matter how individual our experiences may be,” said Woode, who was raised in Prince Rupert and studied at Emily Carr University of Art and Design.

During the making of Roundabout, a piece that uses wood, copper wiring and metal, Woode contemplated the supportive human relationship.

“It seems to me that friends, family and loved ones, in general, do their best to support each other in times of need. At least I like to think so. Sometimes the road is bumpy and we wonder if we are even going in the right direction.”

On Feb. 10 The Avenue will bring in another one-week showing of works, by oil painter Kimberly Kiel, whose paintbrush captures a world of music and dance.

(Kimberly Kiel)

“I paint as an expression of joy and energy. It’s a pure delight to squeeze out huge piles of oil paint, squish it around, have it blend, meld, combine,” Kiel said. “Wet paint, layer upon layer, morphing into a tangible and interesting surface – thick, creamy, an array of gorgeous impasto marks. I strive to leave much to the imagination, for the viewer to fill in the blanks.”

This month downtown’s Madrona Gallery is featuring a collection of drawings by multiple generations of female artists based in Kinngait, Nunavut.

It showcases first-generation artists such as Napachie Pootogook and Mayoreak Ashoona, with second- and third-generation artists, Shuvinai Ashoona, Ningiukulu Teevee, Kudluajuk Ashoona, Nicotye Samayualie, Ooloosie Saila, and more.

Napachie Pootoogook

West End Gallery is featuring Victoria artist Ron Parker this month. Parker takes a keen focus on the beauty of southern Vancouver Island.

“His magnetic scenes bring landscapes to life and invite the viewer to walk into nature,” said West End’s Amy Boyle.

Parker’s 35-year career as an artist started with wildlife painting.

He was driven to depict realistic images of wildlife in their surrounding environment and was working with landscape imagery even before he consciously decided to dedicate himself to it. After 10 years of working with animals it was natural for him to challenge himself with a new direction.

(

Ron Parker’s Flower Island, an oil on canvas, 16 by 36 inches, showing at West End Gallery in February.
(Ron Parker Image)

)

“[Parker’s] landscape paintings envelop the viewer and draw you into the heart of the scene. When he started working on his new direction, he stripped back his style to produce paintings that were more about form and essential elements rather than true representation,” Boyle said.

Parker’s paintings are now masterful renditions of photo-realism that maintain a painterly authenticity, she added.

Winchester Galleries in Oak Bay is featuring the photography of David Ellingsen and paintings by renowned collage artist Toni Onley until Feb. 17. The show is called Promise to Place, Building Relationship with the Land.

Each artist uses the breathtaking landscapes of Canada’s west coast in their work.

Ellingsen’s projects primarily focus on environmental themes such as climate, biodiversity loss, and deforestation. His family has ties to the forest industry, and his work provides striking representations of old-growth forests on Vancouver Island.

Onley’s watercolours depict British Columbia’s rugged natural environment. Onley was a prolific artist and is widely known for his watercolours, oil paintings, etchings, and collages. His style is subtle and unadorned yet timelessly charming.

reporter@oakbaynews.com


 

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