I couldn’t hear them and I was the butt of the joke

'I wish I had addressed my hearing loss much, much sooner. It opens up everything,' says Paul Rodriguez

I couldn’t hear them and I was the butt of the joke

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There is nothing funny about struggling to hear conversations or being the outsider when there’s banter in the office, but the constant teasing that Paul Rodriguez endured because of his hearing issues was the trigger for a life-changing decision.

Paul, who works in sales and is constantly on the phone, explains: “I first realized I had a hearing loss when I was in a busy office environment, with a lot of background noise, and I realized that people were talking to me and I wasn’t picking up on it.

“People deliberately started talking behind my back, knowing that I couldn’t hear, and then they would talk a little bit louder. Once people started laughing, I realized I was the butt of some sort of silly joke. I used to find that frustrating.”

One prank proved to be the final straw. “One of them, as a joke, came back from a holiday and they had brought me an off-the-shelf hearing aid from Hong Kong or Singapore, somewhere like that.”

Then, when Paul met a hearing care professional through friends, he realized that there were actually far more discreet and effective solutions available.

Since the hearing clinic was offering free hearing tests, the only thing Paul had to lose was his hearing problem.

“I decided to go along and have a look and see what could be done. It was not how I expected it to be. I was expecting it to be very clinical, a white building with someone sitting there wearing a white jacket. I thought it would be like going to the dentist. I was pleasantly surprised.”

A comprehensive hearing test takes around an hour and 20 minutes. Your hearing care professional will ask about your health, hearing and lifestyle and use a range of audiometric and everyday speech tests to assess your hearing ability.

If there is a problem, your hearing care professional can explain the latest high-tech digital hearing aids and offer a no-obligation free trial of the device best suited to your needs and budget.

Now Paul says: “I wish I had got in touch with the hearing clinic much, much sooner. It opens up everything. It’s like when you come out of the opticians and have brand new glasses, straight away there was such a vast improvement.

“I must admit when I first put my hearing aids in and I went out, I was stunned at how much I could hear — and how much I had missed out on.”

As well as improving his hearing, it has also made his confidence soar, boosting his social life.

“When I’m out for a meal, I can filter the background noise out and concentrate on the person sitting opposite me. It’s meant I can enjoy meals again.”

Why Choose Miracle-Ear?

• Appointments within 72 hrs of calling

• Lifetime of aftercare

• Qualified Registered Hearing Care Professionals

• Benefit from cutting edge research and technology – with a wide range of options to suit each individual

Request your free hearing test in Victoria here or call 778-402-4158.

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