People often come across fawns they believe to be abandoned, however does will often leave fawns hidden in grass or shrubs for a day or more while they leave to feed without drawing the attention of predators.

See a fawn? Leave it alone!

Discovery Day launches summer season at North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre June 22

The North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre team is passionate about supporting Island wildlife, but each spring, they see many more fawns than they should as well-meaning animal lovers jump to the “rescue” too soon.

Located in Errington, a few minutes outside Parksville, the centre takes in ill, injured or orphaned wildlife, rehabilitating those that can be released back to the wild and providing a home to those that can’t. Non-releasable animals become ambassadors for the needs of wildlife and the vital work undertaken at the centre, which welcomes visitors for self-guided tours and special events.

But while the centre exists to help local wildlife, the key message each spring, as we begin seeing more deer grazing, is this: If you see a fawn, leave it alone, says Sylvia Campbell, association co-founder with husband Robin.

“It’s a huge issue,” Campbell says. “This time of year, as people start hiking more and spending time in the garden, they come across healthy fawns they believe are orphaned or abandoned, and bring them in thinking they’re rescuing them.”

More often that not, however, the fawns are just fine and need to be returned where they were found.

In a unique adaptation, much like their spots, fawns carry no scent, Campbell explains. Their mothers will often leave them hidden in grass or shrubs for a day or more while they leave to feed without drawing the attention of predators.

Similarly, young fawns may appear injured as they toddle across the road after their mother, but rather than being picked up, should be gently herded across to where the doe is likely waiting.

If uncertain about a fawn, call the centre at 250-248-8534 before moving it.

Discover the North Island Wildlife Recovery Association

It’s this kind of essential information the Wildlife Recovery Centre shares through events like Discovery Day, coming up from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 22.

The kick-off to the summer season, Discovery Day is chock full of events and activities for all ages. “Bring the family for a day of discovery!” Campbell says.

In addition to visiting animals like Knut, the centre’s black bear ambassador, and Dougal, their beautiful blind raven, visitors can take in scavenger hunts, a reptile presentation, and drumming with Indigenous artist Bill Helin. Explore Turtle Town, the wildlife garden and the volunteer-led “Learning from the Bones,” sharing fascinating facts revealed by animal skeletons, and have a bite from the on-site food trucks.

Come explore with a special $5 Discovery Day adult rate, with those 12 and younger free.

Throughout the year, donations and volunteers are essential to making the centre’s work possible. Click here to learn about how you can contribute – remember, “They depend on us; we depend on you,” Campbell says.

Learn more at niwra.org, call 250-248-8534 and visit at 1240 Leffler Rd, Errington.

 

Help the North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre in Errington celebrate the start of the summer season during Discovery Day, June 22.

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Peninsula Streams Society to restore 120 metres of Colquitz Watershed

With goal of contributing to the recovery of cutthroat and coho salmon

Victoria City Council approves inclusionary housing policy

After years of back and forth, the policy will be ratified in two weeks

Filipino Heritage Month event takes over Centennial Square

Dancing, music and food highlight Mabuhay Day celebration in Victoria

West Shore residents report finding anti-SOGI 123 flyers in mailboxes

SD62 trustee Ravi Parmar says the flyers are ‘garbage’

Victoria Weekender: What’s happening this weekend, June 15-16

Car Free YYJ, a barber battle and an Outdoor Discovery Day

Homalco tour gives glimpse into area’s ‘People, Land, Water’

First Nation business mixes cultural components with wildlife excursions

B.C. VIEWS: When farmland protection doesn’t protect farmers

Secondary residences aren’t mansions, families tell Lana Popham

Bombers down B.C. Lions 33-23 in season opener

Former Lion Andrew Harris leads Winnipeg with 148 rushing yards

Northern B.C. family remembers murdered Indigenous woman with memorial walk

Still no closure for Ramona Wilson’s family 25 years later

Monkey spotted on late-night jaunt in Campbell River

Conservation officers also apparently looking for cougar in the area

B.C. university to offer mentorship program for former youth in care

Students using the provincial tuition waiver program will soon be able to form a community at KPU

Cyclists competing in one of the toughest bike races on the planet pass through Fernie

Divide riders looking strong as they finish first leg of 4160 km race

You might not know these B.C. records are public

Hired a lawyer to file a civil claim? Those are published online

Most Read