Class-action suit seeks damages for people who got sick from Robin Hood flour

Lawsuit filed following flour recall

EDMONTON — A pair of Alberta-based law firms say they’ve filed a class-action lawsuit on behalf of people who bought or consumed a popular brand of flour that’s been linked to illnesses from E. coli.

James H. Brown and Associates and Higgerty Law say they’re seeking damages from Smucker Foods of Canada Corp. following a national recall of 10-kilogram bags of Robin Hood Original All Purpose Flour.

A statement of claim says the representative plaintiff lives in Victoria, B.C., and became so sick after eating cookie dough that her kidneys began shutting down.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency issued a recall in Western Canada for the flour late last month, and the Public Health Agency of Canada says an outbreak of E. coli O121 has been linked to the flour.

The health agency says there have been 26 cases of people being infected with the bacteria in British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Alberta and Newfoundland and Labrador.

No deaths have been reported, but at least six people required hospital care.

The recall applies to flour with a best-before date of April 17, 2018 (2018 AL 17) and the production code 6 291 548.

No one from the company could be immediately reached for comment about the lawsuit.

A spokeswoman for the J.M. Smucker Co., Maribeth Burns, said last week that the recalled flour was produced at a mill in Saskatoon.

Burns said consumers should note public health warnings not to taste raw dough or batter and that eating a small amount could make people sick.

The lawsuit claims the company breached its duty to safely manufacture goods. It alleges the company was negligent by failing to test its flour thoroughly, and that it failed to recall the tainted flour immediately upon learning people were becoming ill.

It also says the company failed to adopt technological advances in laboratory testing for flour, lacked adequate procedures for cleaning equipment and didn’t train staff properly for food handling.

None of the allegations has been proven in court.

The lawsuit says it seeks compensation for physical and emotional injury and lost wages. It also seeks a refund for consumers who bought the flour. 

Food contaminated with E. coli may not look or smell spoiled, but can still make people sick. Symptoms can include nausea, vomiting, mild to severe abdominal cramps and watery to bloody diarrhea.

The bacteria can be found in the lower intestines of animals and people.

The food agency said it is investigating the source of the E. coli.

The Canadian Press

Just Posted

Saanich man arrested in cross-border drug smuggling operation

William Milton Barnes of Greater Victoria faces multiple charges following six-month investigation

Greater Victoria’s living wage would afford you one latte per year

Cost of living increases drive region’s living wage up 49 cents to $20.50 an hour

Vancouver Island is home to some of the ‘rattiest’ cities in B.C.

Three municipalities in Greater Victoria, and three more around the Island have gnawed their way into the top 20

Spill at Victoria airport prompts emergency response

North Saanich Fire and ambulance respond to spill of unknown substance

North Saanich targets recreational pot on ALR land

District adds voice to municipalities calling for production to stay off ALR land

VIDEO: B.C. man recognized for spinning basketball on toothbrush

Abbotsford man holds world record for longest duration of time of 60.5 seconds

Cat found stuffed in box in Dumpster in northeastern B.C.

Still alive, cat was found near Dawson Creek restrained with zip ties, legs forced behind neck

Fears prompt feds to establish BBQ brush safety standards

Wire-bristle safety fears prompt Ottawa to establish BBQ brush safety standards

Don’t forget about women left to sweep up shards of glass ceiling, W7 urges G7

When Prime Minister Justin Trudeau champions gender equality at the G7 he is being asked to raise the concerns of marginalized women

Canadian air travel industry fears pilot flight-time limits will go too far

Air carriers urge feds to slow down flight-time limits for sleepy pilots

Sky-high farmland prices ‘ruinous’ for B.C. agriculture: UFV ag professor

Fraser Valley-based Tom Baumann says $80K-per-acre in area threatens food security

Sights of Saanich bring smiles to Japanese delegation

A small leap highlighted the short but potentially historic visit of a… Continue reading

Political heavyweights hit Washington in hunt for NAFTA deal

Officials from Prime Minister’s office, Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland part of talks

Greenbelt Microgreens recall in B.C., Alberta, due to Listeria concerns

Canadian Food Inspection Agency says there have been no illnesses linked to the microgreens

Most Read