Premier Rachel Notley reiterated that B.C.’s actions on the Trans Mountain pipeline are illegal and must be reversed. (Photo by The Canadian Press)

Alberta to fight Burnaby’s appeal of NEB Trans Mountain approval: Notley

NEB had granted Kinder Morgan permission to work on a tunnel entrance in Burnaby

Alberta Premier Rachel Notley said that her province will fight Burnaby’s recent appeal of a National Energy Board decision to allow Trans Mountain work to continue in the city.

At a press conference Monday, Notley said that although the wine boycott may be over for now, she’s not planning to let B.C. continue stalling the Kinder Morgan pipeline.

“Later this week, the government of Alberta will intervene in the City of Burnaby’s appeal of the recent NEB decision,” said Notley, adding that Albertan officials are in Ottawa this week to discuss further measures with the federal government.

The pipeline dispute between the neighbouring provinces has gone on since the end of January when Premier John Horgan proposed new restrictions on diluted bitumen transportation by pipeline or rail, at least until the “behaviour” of spilled bitumen can be better understood and a response plan can be made.

Notley retaliated with a boycott of B.C. wine and a suspension of talks about buying B.C. electricity in early February.

The NEB, which had initially approved Trans Mountain in 2016, issued approvals for Kinder Morgan to start work on a tunnel route through Burnaby in mid-February, which Burnaby said it was seeking leave to appeal just two days later.

Burnaby Mayor Derek Corrigan has long been against the pipeline, citing the damage and disruption it would cause his city.

On Feb. 22, Notley dropped the wine ban after Horgan said that his government was preparing a constitutional reference case to demonstrate its right to impose new restrictions on the transport of Alberta crude oil.

Since then, talk about the pipeline had cooled until Notley Monday that not only would Alberta fight Burnaby’s appeal but threatened to bring back the wine ban and institute “other retaliatory measures” if B.C. didn’t stop fighting Trans Mountain.


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

McClure house fire saw Victoria firefighters utilize drone for first time in live situation

Aerial device feeds intel to crews to help formulate firefighting action plans

Victoria says #NeverAgain in solidarity with March For Our Lives

Youth Political Commons invites public to rally against gun violence March 24 at legislature

Jazz songstress Ellen Doty brings her sweet sound to Hermann’s Jazz Club

March 27 concert in Victoria part of national CD release tour

No injuries in single-vehicle accident on Sooke Road

Traffic moving slowly in both directions

New signage to show Victoria residents and tourists the way

Eleven new wayfinding signs use Lekwungen language to guide people from Ogden Point to the Johnson Street Bridge

Submariners come home after 197-day deployment

Tears and laughter filled the jetty where emotional friends and family welcomed the HMCS Submarine Chicoutimi

B.C. Scientists witness first-ever documented killer whale infanticide

“It’s horrifying and fascinating at the same time.”

Charges formally laid against Nanaimo city manager

City of Nanaimo CAO Tracy Renee Samra charged with fear of injury/damage by another person

Okanagan Falls winery showing international photo project

Liquidity Wines will be sole Canadian show of National Geographic’s Photo Ark

Lawyer for one suspect in beating of man with autism says he’s not guilty

Ronjot Singh Dhami will turn himself in, lawyer said

Liberals awarded $100,000 contract to man at centre of Facebook data controversy

Christopher Wylie says his voter-profiling company collected private information from 50 million Facebook users

Facebook’s Zuckerberg admits mistakes in privacy scandal

Zuckerberg admits to privacy scandal involving a Trump-connected data-mining firm, but no apology

UPDATE: Former B.C. city councillor sentenced nine months for sexual assault

Dave Murray, convicted this past fall, hired a private investigator to intrude on the victim’s life.

Online threat to U.S. high school traced to Canadian teen

A 14-year-old girl has been charged in connection with an online threat against a high school

Most Read