Members of Victoria Women in Black gather for a silent vigil at the Inner Harbour on Monday to commemorate victims of the 1945 bombings of Nagasaki and Hiroshima, and to call for the government to sign the UN treaty against nuclear weapons next month. Written on the sign on the right, they say, is the inscription on the war memorial in Japanese and in English. Lauren Boothby/VICTORIA NEWS

Members of Victoria Women in Black gather for a silent vigil at the Inner Harbour on Monday to commemorate victims of the 1945 bombings of Nagasaki and Hiroshima, and to call for the government to sign the UN treaty against nuclear weapons next month. Written on the sign on the right, they say, is the inscription on the war memorial in Japanese and in English. Lauren Boothby/VICTORIA NEWS

Victoria group wants Feds to ban nuclear weapons

They gathered at the Inner Harbour to remember victims of atomic bombs dropped in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

While many celebrated the long weekend across the province, others were in mourning.

Nearly a dozen members of Victoria Women in Black gathered at the Inner Harbour on Monday afternoon to hold a vigil for the 129,000 victims of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, which occurred 72 years ago last weekend.

The group held the demonstration both to commemorate the victims and to pressure the federal government to join the other 122 UN countries in signing a treaty banning nuclear weapons in September.

Terry Wolfwood is a member of the group she says is part of a world-wide movement opposing war and violence.

“We are remembering the only time nuclear weapons have been used in the world, but right now they’re being used to rule the world with fear,” she said.

But for Wolfwood, this isn’t just a history lesson. She hopes remembering the past will inspire others to support banning nuclear weapons today.

“We really hope Canada will sign on with all these other nations and not only ban nuclear weapons, but ban the aiding and production of them,” she said.

Wolfwood and other members of the group drew messages on the sidewalk hoping to draw attention to their cause.

Jane Bracken, another member of the group, said she also supports this weapons ban.

“We care about the planet. We care about you,” she said. “There are too many nuclear bombs in the world.”

The UN treaty will be open for signatures next month at the annual general assembly in New York.

lauren.boothby@vicnews.com