Jassi Sidhu was 25 when she was killed in India. Her throat was cut. (THE NEWS/files)

B.C. pair denied stay of extradition for honour killing in India

Two facing charges in India from 2000

The B.C. Court of Appeal has rejected the request for a stay of the extradition order for Maple Ridge residents Surjit Singh Badesha and Malkit Kaur Sidhu.

The decision was announced Tuesday following a three-day hearing on Nov. 5 to 7.

Sidhu and Badesha are facing extradition after being charged in India with conspiracy to commit murder in connection with the June 2000 death of former Pitt Meadows secondary student Jaswinder Kaur Sidhu, also known as Jassi.

Surjit Singh Badesha is Jassi’s uncle and Malkit Kaur Sidhu is Jassi’s mom.

Lawyers for Malkit Sidhu, in her late 60s, and Badesha, in his early 70s, filed their applications in B.C. Court of Appeal in October 2017, claiming an abuse of process and stating that Canada’s justice minister, on Sept. 28, 2017, refused to accept the applicant’s submissions, didn’t follow the principles of natural justice and violated the pair’s Charter rights.

The earlier extradition was stayed in September 2017 after one of the lawyers filed an appeal, while Sidhu and Badesha were in custody in Toronto, on their way to India to face trial.

According to Appeal Court documents, Sidhu and Badesha had made additional submissions in the weeks before the Supreme Court of Canada ruled in favour of extradition in September 2017.

Jassi was killed in the Indian state of Punjab after she married rickshaw driver Sukhwinder ‘Mithu’ Singh Sidhu.

The court ruled that the submissions were similar to those made in 2014 and said “there is a need for the extradition process to proceed expeditiously and for finality in extradition proceedings.”

The summary of the Appeal Court ruling said that Badesha and Sidhu also have had the opportunity to challenge their extradition for the past seven years and their concerns about the Indian prison system “have been considered by two ministers of justice, this court and the Supreme Court of Canada.”

“Although the minister’s conduct amounted to an abuse of process, it does not warrant a stay of proceedings … ” the panel ruled.

Justices Bauman, Stromberg-Stein and Butler also decided that it was reasonable for the justice minister to surrender the pair to Indian authorities.

Just Posted

‘Norovirus-like’ outbreak interrupts Bantam hockey showcase in Greater Victoria

Several athletes were sent home, quarantined on the ferry

Expect rolling street closures, bus delays as truck convoy moves through region Saturday

The annual Truck Light Convoy will roll through the region starting at 5:45 p.m.

UPDATED: 64-year-old Victoria man David Atkins found

Atkins was found by Sooke RCMP on Saturday morning

VIDEO: Boys help rescue Cariboo bear cub

The cub, weighing just 24lbs, has been taken to wildlife sanctuary in Northwest B.C. for the winter

Greater Victoria 2019 holiday craft fair roundup

Get a jump on your holiday shopping

B.C.-born hockey official talks to IIHF about switching European rule book to NHL rules

Rob Shick will represent NHL at 4th World Hockey Forum in Russia

Miller nets winner as Canucks edge Sabres 6-5 in OT

Roussel, Leivo tally two apiece for Vancouver

$578: that’s how much your first distracted driving ticket will cost with recent premium hikes

Over 50 per cent of Canadians admitted to using phone while driving last year, according to study

Kelowna man attempts to steal bait bike from RCMP parking lot

38-year-old Brian Richard Harbison is facing several charges

‘Things haven’t changed enough:’ Ecole Polytechnique anniversary prompts reflection

Fourteen women were fatally shot by a gunman at the Montreal school on Dec. 6, 1989

Bear raids freezer, gorges on Island family’s Christmas baking

Hungry bruin virtually ignored meat and fish, focused, instead, on the sweets

Most Read