The province has said that it will consider the findings and recommendations of the report prepared by Dr. Peter Wood to meet its CleanBC goals. Photo by Binny Paul/Campbell River Mirror.

The province has said that it will consider the findings and recommendations of the report prepared by Dr. Peter Wood to meet its CleanBC goals. Photo by Binny Paul/Campbell River Mirror.

B.C. will consider recommendations of report linking climate change to logging practices

Province says it is working with First Nations and forest industry towards CleanBC goals

In response to a new study published by Sierra Club BC that linked climate change risks to current forestry practices, the province said that it would consider the findings and recommendations of the study.

The report prepared by Dr. Peter Wood and released earlier this week, Intact Forests, Safe Communities, claimed industrial logging in the province as one of the factors accelerating the risk of climate change disasters in the province.

In its recommendations, Sierra Club BC called on the province to reform its forestry practices, restore intact forests and to include Indigenous expertise to mitigate climate risks. The report also asked the province to hasten the implementation of the 14 recommendations from the 2020 Old Growth Strategic Review

READ MORE: Logging practices increase risk of climate change disasters in B.C.: report

READ ALSO: B.C. suspends some old-growth logging, consults communities

”Our government appreciates the work Dr. Peter Wood and Sierra Club BC did in compiling this report and we will consider the findings and recommendations as we work toward a cleaner B.C.” said the Forest Ministry in an email statement.

The ministry said that sustainable forest and timber management is a priority for British Columbians and the government.

“B.C. is renowned for its commitment to prompt, science-based reforestation as it is an important step to ensure sustainable forest management and address climate change – last year we set a new record with 300 million trees planted and we plan to plant 300 million more this year,” said ministry spokesperson Tyler Hooper.

Hooper also said that the ministry is working with First Nations, industry, labour and communities to ensure practices and management in B.C.’s forest sector continue to evolve to reflect the values British Columbians hold today and what they want for the future.

“This evolution of how we operate in and manage our forests is critical to meeting our CleanBC goals and our commitments under Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act (DRIPA),” said Hooper and added, “We are committed to a balanced and diverse forest sector that supports B.C. jobs and our commitments to the environment and DRIPA.”

In response to the report, members from the forest industry have said that the industry adheres to the strict environmental rules and regulations laid down by the province when it comes to Industrial logging.

Carl Sweet, director of BC Forest Alliance told the Mirror that the forest industry works with biologists and environmentalists to ensure sustainable practices and is committed to replanting trees after harvest.



binny.paul@blackpress.ca

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