According to officials, a 10-year-old boy was walking with two women and three other children, ranging from 10 to 13 years old, at a remote family cabin near Marshall Lake in Lillooet, B.C., on Monday afternoon, Aug. 31, 2020, when the run-in with the big cat occurred. (B.C. Conservation Officer Service handout)

According to officials, a 10-year-old boy was walking with two women and three other children, ranging from 10 to 13 years old, at a remote family cabin near Marshall Lake in Lillooet, B.C., on Monday afternoon, Aug. 31, 2020, when the run-in with the big cat occurred. (B.C. Conservation Officer Service handout)

Boy, 10, alive after family dog jumps into action during cougar attack in Lillooet

Two women and four children were walking near a remote family cabin when the cougar attacked

A B.C. boy is lucky to be alive thanks to a quick reaction by a border collie in what could have been a serious cougar attack in Lillooet.

According to the B.C. Conservation Officer Service, the boy was walking with two women and three other children, ranging from 10 to 13 years old, at a remote family cabin near Marshall Lake on Monday afternoon (Aug. 31) when the run-in with the big cat occurred.

The boy had ran ahead down a trail when the cougar suddenly dropped out of a tree and swiped the child, knocking him to the ground.

“The cougar pursued the boy on the ground, scratching his back and chest,” conservation officers said in a statement Wednesday night.

A border collie with the group jumped on the cougar’s back, while the group started screaming and throwing rocks and sticks – causing the cougar to run away.

Meanwhile, a nearby road worker helped administer first aid. The boy was taken to hospital with non-life threatening injuries.

Conservation officers are now using hounds to track down the cougar.

Cougar attacks are rare in B.C., with roughly 2,500 sightings reported to conservation’s RAPP line.

If you encounter a cougar, officials suggest you stay calm, never run and pick up small children immediately. Children are most at risk in a cougar encounter and they should be taught how to behave appropriately.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Want to support local journalism? Make a donation here.

Conservation

Be Among The First To Know

Sign up for a free account today, and receive top headlines in your inbox Monday to Saturday.

Sign Up with google Sign Up with facebook

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Reset your password

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

A link has been emailed to you - check your inbox.



Don't have an account? Click here to sign up