Christy Clark cancels political staff raises

Premier Christy Clark has rolled back salary increases for political staff in ministry offices, after getting an earful from B.C. voters

Premier Christy Clark

VICTORIA – Premier  Christy Clark has rolled back salary increases for political staff, after getting an earful from voters.

Clark told reporters Wednesday that salary increases for her chief of staff and new positions with the same title in ministers’ offices will not go ahead.

“I have heard a lot from British Columbians in the last week about this issue of changing the pay scales and pay levels for political staff, so today I am rescinding those changes, because leadership means listening to people,” Clark said. “Although the original change would have meant we were underspending the budget by $100,000, I’ve heard loud and clear that people didn’t like it.”

The lone exception is Clark’s new deputy chief of staff, Michele Cadario, hired for the premier’s office after serving as deputy campaign manager for the B.C. Liberal election campaign. Cadario will receive a salary of $195,148 to do the operations and policy roles formerly done by two people.

Dan Doyle, Clark’s chief of staff, remains at the same salary as Cadario. A government spokesman said Doyle never accepted any raise, but recommended the maximum for his position be increased to $230,000 to attract the best candidate for his successor.

The top rate for ministry chiefs of staff, formerly ministerial assistants, will remain at $94,500 a year. The top rate for them was first increased to $105,000, then rolled back to $102,000 before being cancelled. Five of the people appointed to those jobs have had raises cancelled.

NDP leader Adrian Dix, contacted in Kelowna where he is campaigning in a byelection where Clark hopes to win a seat, said the raises show the government is “tone deaf” to the concerns of ordinary people.

Dix said the decision to scrap the raises is “the first victory for Carole Gordon,” the NDP candidate in the Westside-Kelowna byelection.

Gordon is running in the byelection called for July 10, after Clark was defeated by NDP candidate David Eby in a bid to retain her Vancouver-Point Grey seat.

In the May 14 general election, Gordon lost by nearly a two-to-one margin to B.C. Liberal incumbent Ben Stewart, who resigned last week to allow Clark to run.

 

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

View Royal fire chief calls for realistic solutions to ‘mess’ at Thetis Lake

Emergency crews harassed while extinguishing brush fire, rescuing drunk 15-year-old during long weekend calls

Greater Victoria woman goes on gratitude mission to thank first responders

Jen Klein fainted while driving and crashed on Pat Bay Highway in 2019

Non-venomous ball python missing in Vic West

Snake was reported missing to Victoria police Tuesday morning

Multiple Victoria officers injured during violent incidents, including mental health calls over long weekend

Police deploy pepper spray, conducted energy weapon while arresting suspect

B.C. records 146 new COVID-19 cases through long weekend

More that 28 people tested positive for the virus each day since Friday

Canucks tame Minnesota Wild 4-3 to even NHL qualifying series

J.T. Miller leads Vancouver with goal and an assist

COVID-19 vaccine efforts provide hope but no silver bullet to stop pandemic: Tam

There are more than two dozen vaccines for COVID-19 in clinical trials around the world

Two people die in propane heated outdoor shower near Princeton

Couple was attending a long weekend gathering

Study shines light on what makes LGBTQ+ youth feel safe in a community

The study goes beyond looking at school or family supports

Alberta to require masks at schools this fall, but still no mandate in B.C.

B.C. students are also set to return to classrooms in September

B.C. to allow customers to buy cannabis online for in-store pickup at private shops

Age verification will still be required inside the store

30% of British Columbians would ‘wait and see’ before taking COVID vaccine: poll

Some are concerned about side effects, while others don’t think the virus is a big deal

Most Read