Cops can clear crashes faster with new reporting threshold policy

Mandatory, written reports continue for every crash police attend that result in death or injury

Police can clear minor crashes and get traffic flowing more quickly as new reporting policies came into play Friday.

“Having traffic back up because of a minor collision where nobody was hurt doesn’t help anyone – and worse, it can lead frustrated drivers to take steps that are unsafe,” said Mike Farnworth, Minister of Public Safety and Solicitor General in a news release. “Today’s increase in the damage threshold for these kinds of crashes is long overdue and will allow people and police officers to move damaged vehicles out of the way without delay.”

Previously, officers who attended a crash where damage exceeded $1,000 ($600 for motorcycles or $100 for bicycles) had to file a written report before vehicles could be removed. The new policy increases the threshold to $10,000 regardless of vehicle type.

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Police will continue to file a mandatory, written report with ICBC for every crash they attend that results in death or injury.

“Police officers will continue to attend collisions involving minor property damage at their discretion – for example, if questions arise about driver impairment or who’s at fault,” said Chief Const. Neil Dubord, chair of the B.C. Association of Chiefs of Police traffic safety committee. “However, lifting the threshold for mandatory, written reports when officers do attend will help clear crash scenes much more quickly. In turn, it may lower risks for those working at the scene and motorists alike.”



c.vanreeuwyk@blackpress.ca

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