Michele Wonnacott, a pet psychic, is holding a seminar in Nanaimo on Saturday, Nov. 17. (Photo submitted)

Dog psychic can help Vancouver Islanders better connect with their pets

Michele Wonnacott hosts one-day seminar in Nanaimo on Saturday, Nov. 17

Ever since Michele Wonnacott was a little girl, she has been able to understand animals on a much deeper level than most people.

“I just knew exactly what animals were thinking and feeling,” Wonnacott told the News Bulletin.

Wonnacott has since taken her childhood intuition and gone on to become a successful dog trainer and animal psychic, having worked with more than 7,000 dogs over her career.

“I worked with people in the holistic field for years and yet I still l wasn’t fulfilled. It wasn’t until I started working with the dogs that the whole world opened for me, everything just felt right,” she said. “I took hundreds of classes and courses across North America to make sure that this psychic piece that I was feeling and being accurate with dogs in my life was authentic.”

Wonnacott, who grew up in Nanaimo but spent nearly two decades working as a dog trainer in Victoria, recently returned to the Harbour City to focus on her work with animals as a psychic medium.

“I was always the third of fourth dog trainer that people had gone to, but I always knew exactly what they needed, exactly what was going on with their health, with their wellness,” she said. “I’ve worked with tons of dogs, tons of horses, lots of cats. Lots of different animals, but dogs seem to be what come to me.”

On Saturday, Nov. 17, Wonnacott will be holding a pet psychic seminar in Nanaimo. Participants will learn how to recognize and utilize their intuition and how they can use their institution to better understand the needs of their pet.

“It’s for anybody who is scratching their chin and wants to know how to get their animal a better life. What does my pet need? Because we’re just guessing what they need to eat, what they need for vaccinations, what they need for care, what they need for exercise, we’re just guessing,” she said. “It’s about giving people permission to tap into their own abilities and not just continually rely on outside resources that don’t feel right for you.”

Wonnacott who is also the author of a book called I Give You Permission to Grieve for Your Dog, said she’s worked with 10,000 people and has an accuracy rating of 99 per cent. She said it is important for people to understand their animal, especially when something is bothering them.

“When you understand a little bit more of what your animal wants and needs, you become a lot more happier and a lot more relaxed because it causes so much stress for people to not know,” she said.

The seminar is based on 160 questions owners can ask their pet in order to find out if their pet is being affected mentally, emotionally, or spiritually, according to Wonnacott.

“I’ve created an actual animal communication chart … based on the 7,000 dogs that I’ve worked with and it is a questionnaire for students that don’t really know what to ask or how to ask them,” she said.

Wonnacott said participants will not be allowed to bring their pets to the seminar, but can bring photographs. She said participants will not only learn how to read animals, but also be able to read other people’s animals.

“It is in the eyes of the animal,” she said. “You just have to look into their eyes and there are these ways to connect and get information.”

The seminar takes place at 2465 Labieux Rd. between 11 a.m.-6 p.m. on Nov. 17. Cost is $165 including taxes. Participants will receive a custom communication guide poster, a certificate of completion of an animal communication seminar and more. For additional information, visit www.thedogpsychic.com/seminar.



nicholas.pescod@nanaimobulletin.com

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