Finest at Sea retail store employees Kevin Ranger

Finest at Sea retail store employees Kevin Ranger

Double your herring pleasure

Second annual Fishermen Helping Kids children’s cancer fundraiser set for Saturday in James Bay

Expect long lineups for this weekend’s Fishermen Helping Kids with Cancer fresh herring sale at Finest at Sea in James Bay.

“We actually had people coming in today thinking the sale was on this weekend,” FAS retail store staffer Patrick Cunliffe said last Saturday, speaking to its popularity.

It’s the second year for the B.C. Children’s Hospital fundraiser in Victoria and follows a tremendously successful inaugural event.

Finest at Sea vice-president Paul Chaddock said the 10,000 pounds (4,535 kilograms) of fish brought in last year sold by noon, roughly five hours after the sale began.

“We were just blown away by how many people turned out,” he said, adding the company wrote a cheque for more than $10,000 to B.C. Children’s Hospital.

This time around, FAS is bringing in 20,000 pounds hoping to raise even more for the cause. The fish are priced at $20 for 20 pounds, or $15 for 10 pounds and customers are asked to bring their own bucket, if possible.

Customers not interested in carting home bags of raw fish can have FAS staff freeze or vacuum pack them for an extra charge, but all proceeds related to the sale will be donated, Chaddock said.

Inspired by a similar event in Richmond that began three years ago, the fundraiser is something FAS owners and staff feel strongly about supporting, he said.

“(Cancer is) just something that will, if not already, touch all of us throughout our lives, whether it’s a child or grandparent. When you involve kids, it really hits home to people. We’ve got such an amazing hospital system here in B.C., it’s something worth fighting for.”

The sale starts at 7 a.m. and runs until 4 p.m. or when stock runs out. Finest at Sea Ocean Products is at 27 Erie St. For more information, visit fishermenhelpingkidswithcancer.com or call 250-383-7764.

 

What can you do with herring?

There are various food uses for this fish, which usually limits out at 46 centimetres and around .45 kilograms. Among them:

• Pickled herring – a traditional Scandinavian dish and staple in many central European nations, plus some areas of Japan

• Pan fried – Split the fish butterfly style, gut it and grill it in a frying pan

• Rollmops – Pickled herring fillets rolled around a savoury filling

• Kippers – Whole fish smoked or pickled, ofter in brine that deepens the colour of the flesh and converts it to what is known as a “red herring.”