Esquimalt Mayor Barb Desjardins and CFB Esquimalt base commanding officer Capt. (N) Steve Waddell unveil the Lampson Street School First World War memorial tree plaque on Thursday. The plaque draws attention to elm trees that were planted around Lampson Street School in 1917 to honour Esquimalt students killed in action during the war.

Esquimalt unveils First Wolrd War memorial tree plaque

The event forms part of the township's commitment to remembering the sacrifices of those who fought

The Township of Esquimalt officially kicked off a year of remembrance Thursday when Mayor Barb Desjardins unveiled a First World War memorial tree plaque at Lampson Street School.

The plaque draws attention to elm trees that were planted around the school in 1917 to honour Esquimalt students killed in action during the First World War. The tree plantings were part of a cross-Canada initiative during the war to honour soldiers.

The event forms part of the township’s commitment to remembering the sacrifices of those who fought on the centennial of the First World War.

“Telling everyone about these trees through this plaque is long overdue, in fact 97 years overdue,” Desjardins said.

Originally trees were planted for four soldiers – John Dolwer, Arthur Guest, Charles Hardie and Herbert Nankivell – killed in action. The original trees are gone but other trees were planted to remember all First World War soldiers. Those trees can be seen today along Lampson Street and Old Esquimalt Road.

“Today we honour our past,” Desjardins said. “For without the bravery of individual soldiers such as these, celebrating our present and imagining our future would be difficult.”

The plaque is a first in a series of events the township will hold to commemorate the First World War, said Ritchie Morrison, the township’s communication co-ordinator.

On Sept. 4, the township will unveil the refurbishment of its First World War “trophy guns.” The artillery pieces were captured from the Germans during the war. The event at Memorial Park, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., will feature displays, music and artifacts reminiscent of the 1914-18 period.

Just Posted

Choir study shows people with dementia can learn new songs

Volunteers need for Alzheimer’s helpline, World Alzheimer’s Day is Sept. 21

Victoria’s ‘Penny Girl’ to tell story of gender transition in new documentary

Frankie Edroff will write film, Empress Avenue Media to direct, produce project funded by Telus Storyhive

Four Greater Victoria mayors to be acclaimed in fall election

No election in District of Highlands with six council candidates up for six seats

First phase of Highway 14 improvement project nears completion

Province ready to start more work this fall in Sooke

United Way asks Victoria to share local love

2018 campaign aims to raise another $5M

Scheer pushes Trudeau to re-start Energy East pipeline talks

Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer questioned the Prime Minister over Trans Mountain project

Mistaken identity: Missing dog claimed in Moose Jaw belongs to another family

Brennen Duncan was reunited with a white Kuvasz that was found in Saskatchewan

Abandoned kitten safe and sound thanks to B.C. homeless man

‘Jay’ found little black-and-white kitten in a carrier next to a dumpster by a Chilliwack pet store

Police chief defends controversial marijuana seizure

Advocates said cannabis was part of an opioid-substitution program in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside

VIDEO: B.C. deer struggles with life-preserver caught in antlers

Campbell River resident captures entangled deer on camera

Trans Mountain completes Burrard Inlet spill exercise

Training required, some work continues on pipeline expansion

Supporters of B.C. man accused of murdering Belgian tourist pack courtoom

Family and friends of Sean McKenzie, 27, filled the gallery for brief court appearance in Chilliwack

Pot, cash, mansions: Judge divvies up illegal estate of divorcing B.C. couple

The Smiths ran a multi-million marijuana operation that spanned three counties

Most Read