A Grizzly bear is seen in a field, captured by a remote camera in Wapusk National Park, Man., in a 2017 handout photo. Wapusk is one of many areas where researcher Douglas Clark says the bears are expanding their range in Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-University of Saskatchewan, *MANDATORY CREDIT*

A Grizzly bear is seen in a field, captured by a remote camera in Wapusk National Park, Man., in a 2017 handout photo. Wapusk is one of many areas where researcher Douglas Clark says the bears are expanding their range in Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-University of Saskatchewan, *MANDATORY CREDIT*

Grizzly bears move north in High Arctic as climate change expands range

Inuvialuit hunters and trappers say grizzly bears are showing up in increasing numbers

Some unlikely neighbours are moving in around the northernmost communities of the Northwest Territories, across the icy tundra of Canada’s High Arctic.

Inuvialuit hunters and trappers say grizzly bears are showing up in increasing numbers on islands of the Beaufort Sea and experts say climate change is likely a driving factor.

“The grizzly bears are moving into new areas,” said Vernon Amos, chairman of the Inuvialuit game council, in an interview from Inuvik, N.W.T.

At about 3,400 residents, Inuvik is the most populous community within the Inuvialuit Settlement Region that stretches across about 100,000 square kilometres of land.

Grizzlies have long roamed the four mainland Inuvialuit communities, including Inuvik, but there are more of them and they’re appearing for the first time around the two more northerly communities of Sachs Harbour and Ulukhaktok, he said.

Amos, 42, grew up in Sachs Harbour and says the ecosystem has changed significantly over his lifetime. While the seasonal freeze used to begin in August, this year it occurred toward the end of September or early October — an increasingly common occurrence, he said.

“There is a much longer melting and growing season. Areas that were tundra or barren for the most part are now grasslands and have other types of vegetation. Willow, for instance, are starting to establish themselves and grow higher or taller,” he said.

Doug Clark, a University of Saskatchewan associate professor in the school of environment and sustainability, is working with members of the community to document the bears.

During a layover in Calgary on his way back from the territory, Clark said in a phone interview that he has installed four remote cameras in areas where locals say they’ve spotted the massive animals, and distributed eight more cameras to local hunters and trappers to install.

The movement of the grizzlies in the North is significant because it’s part of a wide scale expansion, he said.

“That’s not the only part of Canada where grizzlies are expanding their range,” he said.

Grizzly bears have lost significant habitat to human settlement across North America and continue to struggle in some regions. But they have been expanding their range northward for several years, he said. One area seeing more grizzlies is the west coast of Hudson Bay, including Wapusk National Park near Churchill, Man., best known for its roaming polar bears.

With no southerly source population, it shows that grizzlies aren’t just moving north, they’re moving east and south as well.

“Something pretty big is going on and we don’t know why,” Clark said.

The most obvious question — why now and why not earlier? — suggests climate change is playing a role alongside other changes like resource development.

“They’re very much looking like one of the early winners in the climate change sweepstakes. But what that means in the long term, we don’t really know,” Clark said.

The bears are not the only species expanding their range and the High Arctic isn’t the only place with a changing climate.

Some of the biggest changes are happening in ocean environments and coastal areas, said Brian Starzomski, director of environmental studies at the University of Victoria. Melting glaciers are cooling the climate in northeastern North America, while an unusual warming event known as “The Blob” has brought some tropical species like the pufferfish to British Columbia’s waters.

Inland, wildfires are burning bigger, hotter and over wide areas. Mountains are also a hot spot for range changes, as species typically move both pole-ward and toward higher altitudes.

Species that can move easily — birds and insects — are expected to fare better than those that are stagnant, Starzomski said.

Of particular concern are species like the subalpine larch, a tree that lives at or near the tops of mountains in B.C. and Alberta. It can live for 1,000 years but it also takes almost 100 to 200 years to reproduce.

“It probably can’t reproduce fast enough or move its seeds long enough distances to respond quickly to climate change,” he said.

But blaming it all on climate change is too simple, he said. Humans have done a “great job” of introducing invasive species to new ecosystems through global trade, polluting the atmosphere and making land use decisions that destroy habitats or sever migration routes, he said.

“There’s a lot of pressure on nature at the moment. We talk a lot about climate change, but all of these things add up in the matter of human impact on the environment,” he said.

Amy Smart, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

February 17, 2021 - Kaelyn (L) and Costin Campbell are Goldstream News Gazette 2021 Local Heroes.
Pint-sized duo inspires others to be green

Costin and Kaelyn Campbell are this year’s Environmental Heroes

Erin Oldman received a scholarship through Royal Roads University (RRU), called the Legacy Award, which is given out once every five years. Oldman graduated from RRU with a Masters of Arts in Human Security and Peacebuilding, and is using the award to establish a charity called International Humanitarian Assessments, which helps people in war-torn areas of the Middle East. (Photo contributed by Erin Oldman)
Royal Roads University graduate receives $25,000 award

Erin Oldman will use the award to establish a charity in the Middle East

Sandy Carmichael is a Goldstream Gazette 2021 Local Hero as Seniors’ Champion. (Don Denton/Black Press Media)
Worker bee returns to volunteer: Sandy Carmichael a fixture at Langford Royal Canadian Legion

Sandy Carmichael is the 2021 recipient of the Seniors’ Champion Award

The It’s Critical campaign has raised $5.89 million towards its $7 million goal to expand critical care capacity at Victoria’s Royal Jubilee Hospital. (Black Press Media file photo)
Critical care improvements make the list with Greater Victoria shoppers

Save-On-Foods pledges $300,000 to Victoria Hospitals Foundation’s It’s Critical campaign

West Shore Parks and Recreation facilities face a challenging future in terms of funding, due to reduced operations throughout the pandemic. (Black Press Media file photo)
West Shore Parks and Recreation faces challenging future

West Shore Parks and Recreation Society submits 2021 budget request to owner municipalities

Abbotsford’s Kris Collins turned to TikTok out of boredom when the provincial COVID-19 lockdown began in March 2020. She now has over 23 million followers on the video app. Photo: Submitted
Internet famous: Abbotsford’s Kris Collins is a TikTok comedy queen

Collins has found surprise stardom alone with a phone

Jasmine and Gwen Donaldson are part of the CAT team working to reduce stigma for marginalized groups in Campbell River. Photo by Marc Kitteringham, Campbell River Mirror
Jasmine’s story: Stigma can be the hardest hurdle for those overcoming addiction

Recovering B.C. addict says welcome, connection and community key for rebuilding after drug habit

A Vancouver restaurant owner was found guilty of violating B.C.’s Human Rights Code by discriminating against customers on the basis of their race. (Pixabay)
Vancouver restaurant owner ordered to pay $4,000 to customers after racist remark

Referring to patrons as ‘you Arabs’ constitutes discrimination under B.C.’s Human Rights Code, ruling deems

Dasher is back home with mom Christine Girvin thanks to some help from BC Ferries staff. Photo supplied
The cat came back, with help from BC Ferries staff

After Dasher made a dash, staff in Comox found her and got her home safe

Nanaimo children’s author and illustrator Lindsay Ford’s latest book is ‘Science Girl.’ (Photo courtesy Lindsay Ford)
B.C. children’s writer encourages girls to pursue the sciences in new book

Lindsay Ford is holding a virtual launch for latest book, ‘Science Girl’

Pig races at the 145th annual Chilliwack Fair on Aug. 12, 2017. Monday, March 1, 2021 is Pig Day. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress file)
Unofficial holidays: Here’s what people are celebrating for the week of Feb. 28 to March 6

Pig Day, Canadian Bacon Day and Grammar Day are all coming up this week

Staff from the Marine Mammal Rescue Centre, passersby, RCMP and Nanaimo Fire Rescue carried a sick 300-kilogram steller sea lion up the steep bluff at Invermere Beach in north Nanaimo in an attempt to save the animal’s life Thursday. (Photo courtesy Marine Mammal Rescue Centre)
300-kilogram sea lion muscled up from B.C. beach in rescue attempt

Animal dies despite efforts of Nanaimo marine mammal rescue team, emergency personnel and bystanders

Doctors and counsellors warn of an increase in panic attacks, anxiety, depression and suicide ideas between ages 10 to 14, in Campbell River. ( Black Press file photo)
Extended pandemic feeding the anxieties of B.C.’s youth

Parents not sure what to do, urged to reach out for help

Gina Adams as she works on her latest piece titled ‘Undying Love’. (Submitted photo)
‘Toothless’ the kitty inspires B.C. wood carver to break out the chainsaw

Inspired by plight of a toothless cat, Gina Adams offers proceeds from her artwork to help animals

Most Read