Hundreds gather at Sidney’s waterfront to witness rare solar eclipse

Hundreds of people donned special glasses, used makeshift viewers from cereal boxes or came up with other novel ways of viewing Monday’s partial solar eclipse in Sidney. (Steven Heywood/News staff)Hundreds of people donned special glasses, used makeshift viewers from cereal boxes or came up with other novel ways of viewing Monday’s partial solar eclipse in Sidney. (Steven Heywood/News staff)
One of the many neat tricks to see the solar eclipse was using a colander. Each pinhole on the ground was the crescent moon partially blocking the sun. (Steven Heywood/News staff)One of the many neat tricks to see the solar eclipse was using a colander. Each pinhole on the ground was the crescent moon partially blocking the sun. (Steven Heywood/News staff)
An image of Monday’s solar eclipse, as seen from downtown Sidney. (Steven Heywood/News staff)An image of Monday’s solar eclipse, as seen from downtown Sidney. (Steven Heywood/News staff)
People gathered in Sidney’s Beacon Park Monday morning to witness the patial solar ecipse. (Steven Heywood/News staff)People gathered in Sidney’s Beacon Park Monday morning to witness the patial solar ecipse. (Steven Heywood/News staff)
Brenda and Bill Scott marveled at the partial solar eclipse on Monday - and they were kind enough to share their special looking glasses. (Steven Heywood/News staff)Brenda and Bill Scott marveled at the partial solar eclipse on Monday - and they were kind enough to share their special looking glasses. (Steven Heywood/News staff)
Bonnie Donaldson of Sidney used binoculars and paper to capture a look at Monday’s solar eclipse. (Steven Heywood/News staff)Bonnie Donaldson of Sidney used binoculars and paper to capture a look at Monday’s solar eclipse. (Steven Heywood/News staff)

Monday’s partial solar eclipse drew hundreds of people to Sidney’s waterfront, to witness an approximately 89 per cent eclipse of the sun.

There were special viewing glasses, a cereal box with pinholes and tin foil to catch a reflection of the eclipse and to keep one’s eyes safe. Another person was using binoculars to reflect the light onto paper to see the eclipse. And yet another person used a colander – and the pinhole reflections on the ground each resembled a tiny crescent moon.

While it didn’t quite get as dark as some would have hoped, it was still a milestone for them to witness such a rare occurrence.