Keep your dog contained, pleads Victoria-based Canada Post worker after attack

Woman asks dog owners to help keep delivery agents safe

A Victoria-based Canada Post worker is pleading with the public to keep dogs contained.

Leslie Black has been a delivery agent for Canada Post for 24 years, starting her Victoria career in 2009.

She tells Black Press Media that although she loves her job – being outside, meeting people, even experiencing the elements – a recent experience with a homeowner’s dog left her fearful – and motivated.

Leslie Black has been delivering for Canada Post for 24 years, but a recent incident has motivated her to ask dog owners to keep their dogs away from delivery agents. (Photo Courtesy of Leslie Black)

“Be mindful that your dog might be friendly but they’re going to be protective and they are unpredictable,” Black says. “Many dog owners are in denial or naive about that. It’s just awareness and education. I want it to be automatic that when someone rings the bell you secure the dog before you answer the door.”

READ ALSO: Canada Post carrier seriously injured in Saanich dog attack

Black won’t share details, but says the recent attack had her off work for four months.

“Myself and my family are still suffering the repercussions of that incident,” she says. “It is life-altering when we get attacked. I am a different person now because of this incident.”

According to Canada Post, one in three homes served by the national postal service have dogs.

“We are asking all dog owners to help us deliver your letters and parcels safely by keeping their dogs secure and at a safe distance,” says a statement from Nicole Lecompte, media relations for Canada Post. “Many of our delivery agents are dog lovers, and dog owners, but they can still experience dog-related injuries.”

Black loves dogs and has one herself, but says the public needs to know the risks. Now that Canada Post delivery agents – formally known as letter carriers – are delivering more packages, there are more person-to-person interactions, meaning more opportunities for dog encounters.

“There is not one single Canada Post delivery agent that has not a bad encounter with a dog,” she says, adding that she was fearful to return to her job, but is working again. “My threshold as to what I fear is safe or OK has been lowered. Even if we say we love dogs and are OK with dogs, it’s just not necessary and that risk is not worth it.”

While delivery agents can refuse delivery to a home where they feel unsafe, many dogs can’t be seen until it’s too late. Black says she is advocating for “zero tolerance.”

“Let’s not have any interactions – whether it’s a friendly dog or not – because they’re just too unpredictable,” she says. “I’m trying to educate people to remember that it’s best for everybody if…the dog has no chance to get to the door.”

READ ALSO: Canada Post workers are asking owners to keep dogs secure



nina.grossman@blackpress.ca

Follow us on Instagram
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Gaps in the system: Youth cope with homelessness in Greater Victoria

Four-part series will look at youth homelessness in the region

Museum asks British Columbians for COVID-19 nature observations

Royal BC Museum collects information as part of ongoing pandemic project

Oak Bay pool to reopen Aug. 17

Swimming, other activities return this month

Island riders conquering new heights

With no races, cyclists tackle Everest challenge to lift community

Saanich police search for suspect accused of using stolen credit, debit cards

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers says suspect made numerous fraudulent purchases

53 new COVID-19 cases, no new deaths cap off week of high infection rates in B.C.

Roughly 1,500 people are self-isolating because they either have COVID-19 or have been exposed to it

Moving on: Tanev scores 11 seconds into OT as Canucks oust Wild

Vancouver beats Minnesota 5-4 to move into first round of NHL playoffs

Fitness non-profit challenges citizens to invent a game to be physically active

The campaign was launched after a study showed only 4.8 per cent of children and youths in Canada met required standards of the 24-hour movement guidelines

Gene editing debate takes root with organic broccoli, new UBC research shows

Broccoli is one of the best-known vegetables with origins in this scientific haze

VIDEO: U.S. Air Force pilot does fly-by for B.C. son amid COVID border separation

Sky-high father-son visit plays out over White Rock Pier

3 Vancouver police officers test positive for COVID after responding to large party

Union president says other officers are self-isolating due to possible exposure

Vancouver Island team takes on wacky challenges of world’s largest scavenger hunt

Greatest International Scavenger Hunt taking place Aug. 1-8

New mothers with COVID-19 should still breastfeed: Canada’s top doctor

Dr. Theresa Tam made the recommendation during World Breastfeeding Awareness Week

Collapse of Nunavut ice shelf ‘like losing a good friend:’ glaciologist

The ice shelf on the northwestern edge of Ellesmere Island has shrunk 43 per cent

Most Read