Lacrosse fan brings sport film to Star Cinema

Pauquachin teen hopes to share the history of his people’s sport

When Landon Underwood came across a movie he identified with, he figured it was something worth sharing.

“It seems pretty inspirational,” he said.

The 13-year-old lacrosse fanatic stumbled across a trailer for Crooked Arrows, a newly released film about lacrosse with a strong local connection and told his dad, Pauquachin chief Bruce Underwood about it.

The teen couldn’t find any cinemas playing the movie locally so his dad encouraged him to take action.

“It wasn’t anywhere in Victoria, it was only in Vancouver,” Landon said. He went to see Sandy Oliver at Star Cinema. “I asked if she could bring in Crooked Arrows.”

And she did.

“I think it’s pretty cool,” Landon said.

The film is scheduled to start screening Friday, July 6 and could run for about a week.

“These are our lovely community members and they’ve been supportive of us for years,” Oliver said. “There are films that speak to individuals and communities [and] that’s what we’re here for.”

And there’s that local tie-in.

Gary Gait, known as the best lacrosse player of all time with his twin, Paul, is featured in the film. Gait played for the Peninsula Warriors and attended Claremont secondary school. He played for the Victoria Shamrocks before starring in the National Lacrosse League, Major League Lacrosse and the Canadian national team. Gait has been inducted into the United States Lacrosse National Hall of Fame and the National Lacrosse League Hall of Fame.

Landon plays centre for the Peninsula Warriors bantam A1 team.

“He’s never seen a lacrosse movie before,” Bruce said of his son. “I think also just to highlight the fact that he’s always inspired by other people doing well and he’s always trying to do his best.”

Landon said he hopes the film will inspire others, as well as teach them the origins of lacrosse and its roots in First Nations culture.

Star Cinema is at 9842 Third St. Go to starcinema.ca or call 250-655-1171 for information.

 

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