Last chance, last dance for civic election candidates

Politicos court undecided voters as civic election nears end

There will be a lot of door knocking before this weekend.

Mayoral candidates in Victoria and Esquimalt will be doing everything they can to get their names out there and connect with voters before the results are in on Saturday night.

“It’s not over yet,” said Esquimalt Mayor Barb Desjardins. “We’re still out there trying to engage everybody in any way possible.”

Desjardins said for her, going door to door and talking to residents has been an effective tool.

“The residents of Esquimalt have been willing to open their doors; they’re certainly engaged, they’re asking questions.”

Besides knocking on doors, Desjardins said she has also been using Facebook as a way to generate conversations, and also meeting and greeting people in public places.

“People are very happy to come up to you and give you their thoughts,” she said.

Esquimalt mayoral candidate Scott Attrill said he has been going out door knocking as well, every night after work. Although he said he already knows many of the people through his barber shop, Floyd’s Hairstyling.

“It’s just a matter of letting them know that Scott Attrill is Floyd,” he said.

Attrill added he is running for mayor because of certain issues in the township. “If you want a true representation of your concerns, then you need to vote,” he said.

Esquimalt mayoral candidate John Ducker said he has been trying to reach as many people as he can through canvasing door-to-door as well as newspaper and radio ads. He said meeting residents in person has been crucial.

“The more you can come into contact with people directly, the better it is,” said Ducker. “I’m sensing strongly in the community that people want a different perspective in their municipal councils.”

In Victoria, the mayoral candidates are also working hard on the last day before the election.

“We’re out knocking on every door, we’re making phone calls, we are out talking to people on the street,” said Mayor Dean Fortin. “It gives an opportunity for people to know who you are. It’s about understanding the values behind the person you’re voting for.”

Victoria mayoral candidate Stephen Andrew is also continuing to campaign up until the end of the election.

“We’re definitely calling people, continuing to have meetings with groups, standing on the side of the road with signs and creating awareness,” said Andrew.

He said knocking on doors has been an effective way of connecting with people.

“I cannot walk down the street now without someone coming up and wishing me well,” said Andrew. “You really see, when you get involved in this process, how much difference you can make in people’s lives.”

Victoria mayoral candidate Ida Chong said she will not rest until she has gotten the chance to speak with as many people as she can.

“All you can do is let people know a little more about you,” said Chong. “When it comes to local politics, it is really about people connecting much much more than at the provincial or federal level.”

Chong said it is important to get out to vote and consider who would be best for the job.

“If you do want a change in leadership … then I would ask [voters] to cast their eyes on all the candidates, and who would be the one most [capable] for the position.”

Victoria mayoral candidate Lisa Helps said she has been door knocking since July, and continues to do so along with making phone calls and handing out flyers. She said most important for her is connecting one-on-one with people.

“Really it is building a relationship with as many people as possible that can get to know me,” said Helps. “Word of mouth is key.”

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