The “Reef Nets” design s is one of four banners designed by Dylan Thomas that now lines Douglas Street (Nicole Crescenzi/News Staff)

The “Reef Nets” design s is one of four banners designed by Dylan Thomas that now lines Douglas Street (Nicole Crescenzi/News Staff)

Local Coast Salish artist sees his work displayed in Downtown Victoria

Dylan Thomas designed four banners that are now hanging on Douglas Street

Downtown Victoria streets are now lined with the work of a local Coast Salish artist.

On Tuesday morning city staff strung up banners designed by Dylan Thomas, who designed four banners to depict the traditional stories about the Lekwungen People.

“As a person with Lekwungen (Songhees) heritage, who was born and raised in Victoria, I feel a profound connection to this area in its modern, historical and pre-historical contexts, all of which I’ve tried to capture in my banner designs,” said Thomas in a statement. “For these banners, I’ve symbolized some of the lesser-known aspects of this territory’s history and mythology.”

ALSO READ: Human Rights museum to restore Coast Salish artist’s Witness Blanket

The first design, titled “Born on the Shores” depicts Thomas’ great grandmother, who was one of the last people born in the Old Songhees Village – now called Songhees Point – less than a year before the reserve was transferred to its current location.

The next is titled “Camossung” was a little girl who in legends turned into a boulder that sat in the waters at the Tillicum Narrows. The boulder created a rare, tide-dependant, two-directional waterfall before it was blown up in 1960. The area which became known as For Victoria was temporarily called Fort Camossung before.

ALSO READ: Greater Victoria totem project matches people with master carver

“Building the Bastion” depicts salmon and Salish figures to represent the collaboration between the Lekwungen People and the Hudson’s Bay Company representatives who worked together to build Fort Victoria.

Lastly, “Reef-Nets” honors the skill of reef-net fishing, which was exclusively used by the Salish community.

The banners are stationed along Douglas Street and will be in place until October.

vnc.editorial@blackpress.ca


 

vnc.editorial@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter
and Instagram

City of VictoriaCouncil of Yukon First Nations

 

Two of the four designs by Dylan Thomas, which are now hanging on Douglas Street. (File contributed/City of Victoria)

Two of the four designs by Dylan Thomas, which are now hanging on Douglas Street. (File contributed/City of Victoria)