FILE - In this Aug. 9, 2017, file photo, Louis C.K., co-creator/writer/executive producer, participates in the “Better Things” panel during the FX Television Critics Association Summer Press Tour at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, Calif. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File)

Louis C.K. accuser ‘infuriated’ by Canadian comedy booker’s defence

Accuser says she did not consent to C.K. undressing and masturbating in front of her

One of Louis C.K.’s accusers is disputing a Canadian comedy club CEO’s reasons for booking the standup superstar earlier this year.

Julia Wolov says she is “infuriated” by an article written by Yuk Yuk’s founder Mark Breslin for the Canadian Jewish News that downplays sexual misconduct she and several other women faced from the disgraced comic.

The L.A.-based comedy writer penned a counterpoint that lists several inaccuracies in Breslin’s article, which claimed she and others consented to sexual behaviour that occurred more than 10 years ago. The comic admitted to exposing himself to several women while in a position of power following a bombshell 2017 New York Times report involving five accusers.

Wolov says she hasn’t spoken about her experiences since that New York Times story, but was moved to go public this week because Breslin touted C.K.’s Jewish heritage as another reason to support him. Wolov says she and three of his other accusers from the article are also Jewish.

She says she did not consent to C.K. undressing and masturbating in front of her, and to suggest otherwise is wrong.

Breslin booked C.K. for a string of sold-out shows in Toronto in October. He declined further comment but says in his article that “rattling the cage of polite society is part of the job of comics, onstage and off.”

Since coming forward, Wolov says she has only worked once and believes she has been passed over for writing jobs because of the controversy. And while she doubts C.K. will ever work commercially again, she notes that he seems to have no trouble booking standup gigs.

The allegations had swift impact on the comedy giant — he lost a production deal at FX; his dark comedy, “I Love You, Daddy,” was pulled from distribution; and Netflix dropped a planned C.K. stand-up special.

But C.K. eventually returned to the club circuit, and recently launched a world tour that includes dates in the United States, Israel, Italy, Switzerland, Slovakia and Hungary.

In November 2017, Wolov and her comedy partner Dana Min Goodman told the New York Times that C.K. stripped and masturbated in front of them in 2002 after inviting the duo to his hotel room to celebrate their performance at a comedy festival in Aspen, Colo.

Wolov says they don’t regret speaking out but that the fallout “has been difficult.”

“He won’t go away and it won’t go away. We really want to do something so we aren’t just the girls who Louis C.K. masturbated in front of because we aren’t that. We’ve been doing this for 26 years, we’ve been writing and performing and now that’s our new title.”

Breslin’s article was posted Friday, and Wolov’s counterpoint was published Tuesday. Neither Breslin nor the Canadian Jewish News would comment further.

Wolov says there have been “hundreds of articles” about the controversy in the past two years but that Breslin’s piece in particular struck a nerve.

“I just found it absolutely disgusting the way he made excuses and sort of normalized what Louis C.K. did,” says the 47-year-old comedy writer, who does not perform standup.

“But the thing that really got me (was) at the end how he reveals that Louis C.K.’s grandfather was a Jew so he’s even happier to put him up in his comedy club. I’m Jewish. I was like, ‘No, no, no, no. You don’t get to go into my community and try and convince them and normalize what Louis C.K. did. I find that disgusting when basically the only reason (Breslin) did it was to make money.”

Wolov says she and Goodman are now writing a book about their friendship that will include a chapter about the allegations, although they have yet to find a publisher. They are also writing a dark comedy but Wolov says it hasn’t been easy pitching TV projects.

She worries about the message that Breslin’s attitude sends to other victims of sexual misconduct thinking about coming forward.

“There are days where I think, ‘God why did I do this?’” she says.

“If people are going to come out now they (will) see how it’s affected us. Why would they?”

READ MORE: Comedian Louis C.K. says allegations of sexual misconduct are true

Cassandra Szklarski, The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Sooke’s Paul Larouche gold snipes along Sooke River, a process in which he uses a mask and snorkel to find pieces of gold. (Aaron Guillen/News Staff)
Hitting the jackpot: Sooke man finds niche audience by gold-panning on YouTube

Paul Larouche, 29, with over 215,000 subscribers, opens up about his journey

Retiring local politicians Carole James and Andrew Weaver will receive annual payouts estimated at $87,000 and $34,000, respectively, under the pension plan for outgoing MLAs in B.C., according to the Canadian Taxpayers Federation. (Black Press Media file photos)
Taxpayer watchdog howling over outgoing MLAs’ pension payouts

Carole James, Andrew Weaver among Island MLAs whose pensions are calculated by taxpayers federation

An incident on Sooke Road is slowing traffic Wednesday evening. (Courtesy of Mona Hazeldine)
Second driver not found after Sooke Road crash snarls evening traffic

Two vehicles involved in rear-end crash Wednesday evening

BC Ferries vessel Skeena Queen pulls into the dock at Fulford Harbour on Salt Spring Island. (Black Press File Photo).
BC Ferries faces calls for improved reliability on Swartz Bay-Fulford Harbour route

Recent mechanical breakdown resulted in sailing cancellations

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry updates the COVID-19 situation, B.C. legislature, Oct. 26, 2020. (B.C. government)
B.C.’s COVID-19 case count jumps by 287, another senior home outbreak

Two more deaths recorded, community outbreak in Okanagan

Anyone with information on any of these individuals is asked to call 1-800-222-TIPS (8477) or visit the website victoriacrimestoppers.ca for more information.
Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers wanted list for the week of Oct. 27

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau shakes hands with US Vice-President Joe Biden on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Friday, December 9, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Patrick Doyle
A Biden presidency could mean good news for Canadian environment policy: observers

Experts and observers say even a U.S. outside the Paris agreement may ultimately end up in the same place

People take a photo together during the opening night of Christmas Lights Across Canada, in Ottawa, on Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2019. The likelihood that most Canadians will enjoy a holly jolly Christmas season of gatherings, caroling and travel is unlikely, say public health experts who encourage those who revel in holiday traditions to accept more sacrifices ahead. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
Ho, ho, no: Experts advise preparing for a scaled-back COVID holiday season

Many of the holiday season’s highlights have already been scrapped or are unlikely to take place

Sen. Kim Pate is shown in Toronto in an October 15, 2013, file photo. The parliamentary budget office says a proposed law that would give judges discretion on whether to apply a lesser sentence for murder could save the federal government $8.3 million per year. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Colin Perkel
Judicial discretion for mandatory minimum sentences for murder would save $8.3M: PBO

The result would be fewer people in long-term custody at federal correctional institutions, experts say

Commissioner Austin Cullen looks at documents before opening statements at the Cullen Commission of Inquiry into Money Laundering in British Columbia, in Vancouver on February 24, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
RCMP lacked dedicated team to investigate illegal activities at casino, inquiry hears

Hearings for the inquiry are set to continue into next week and the inquiry is expected to wrap up next year

Robert Riley Saunders. (File)
Court approves money for B.C. foster children alleging harm from Kelowna social worker

The maximum combined total award for basic payments and elevated damages for an individual is $250,000

MMFN First Nation has said that it will restrict access to portion of Highway 28 that passes through the Nation’s land until a road use agreement is reached. (Black Press file photo)
Vancouver Island First Nation blocks highway access to logging trucks in Gold River

Mowachaht/Muchalaht First Nation restricting access for Western Forest Products pending road deal

Most Read