The District of Metchosin’s municipal hall on Happy Valley Road. (Kendra Wong/News Gazette staff)

Metchosin supports moving to three-year municipal term

Some councillors say four years is too much of a commitment

The District of Metchosin has thrown its support behind a resolution that would change the number of years a council could be elected for.

During a meeting earlier this week, mayor and councillors voted to support a draft resolution to reinstate a three-year term for municipal office, which will be sent later this year to the Association of Vancouver Island and Coastal Communities (AVICC), an area association under the umbrella of the Union of B.C. Municipalities (UBCM).

Coun. Moralea Milne, who requested council’s support, said the current four-term term is too long and is a big commitment for anyone running for office, particularly in the smaller communities such as Metchosin. Not only are there council meetings, but councillors are also responsible for serving on numerous committee, which can turn into what feels like a full-time job to some.

“It stops people from running … There’s really a lot that can be asked of you,” said Milne, who has been in office for three terms and enjoys the work, but will not be running for re-election this year.

“If you have a particularly dysfunction council or one that is at odds with the community, four years is a long time to wait for a change. There are not that many mechanisms to change a council or a council member.”

Milne believes a three-year term would be more beneficial in the long run as it would encourage more young people to run and would hold councils accountable to residents.

Mayor John Ranns agreed, adding a three-year term is a much more manageable time frame.

“Three years is a good time frame towards achieving a mandate and renewing a mandate. When you run for office, you get up on the podium and tell people this is the direction I think you people want us to take and if you get elected, they’ve [residents] given you a mandate or approval of what your vision is,” he said.

“[A three year term] gives you the time to be able to establish what it is that the public wanted, to establish that vision, but also gives the public the opportunity to say ‘well you’re not doing it the way we wanted’.”

Changing the number of years councils are elected for is a topic that’s been debated in recent years. In 2013, a UBCM motion increased the municipal term from three years to four.

The resolution will be sent to AVICC in April. If it passes, the resolution will then be sent to UBCM in September for approval.


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

kendra.wong@goldstreamgazette.com

Just Posted

Island Corridor Foundation optimistic about restoring rail service

If green-lighted, first priority would be Langford to Victoria route

Active investigation into reported sexual assault at CFB Esquimalt

An Oct. 5 allegation is being investigated by Canadian Forces National Investigation Service

Federal environment minister faces protesters in Saanich

Catherine McKenna defended her government’s environmental record

Food service workers at Victoria airport protest for second time in four months

Negotiations continue to drag on with employer Compass Group Canada, VAA refuses to engage

Taxis in bus lanes not being considered, Victoria Transit chair says

Susan Brice responds to a cab driver’s request for access to Douglas Street priority lanes

People flocking to Vancouver Island city to see hundreds of sea lions

Each year the combination of Steller and California sea lions take over Cowichan Bay

POLL: Have BC Ferry waits ever forced you to cancel your travel plans?

Many BC Ferry passengers heading out from Swartz Bay to Tsawwassen on… Continue reading

Canadians more prepared for weather disaster than financial one: poll

RBC recommends people check their bank app as often as the weather app

B.C. dog owner sues after pet killed in beaver trap

A Kamloops man is suing the operator of a trapline north of the city after his dog died

Heading soccer balls can cause damage to brain cells: UBC study

Roughly 42 per cent of children in the country play soccer, according to statistics from Heritage Canada

Supreme Court hears case on migrant detainees’ rights to challenge incarceration

Currently, migrants who do not hold Canadian citizenship can only challenge detention through an immigration tribunal or a judicial review.

Canada Post issues new offer to employees as eBay calls on Ottawa to end strikes

Ebay is calling on the federal government to legislate an end to the Canada Post contract dispute, warning that quick action is needed to ensure retailers don’t lose out on critical Black Friday and Cyber Monday sales.

No G20 member has climate plan strong enough to meet Paris targets: report

Canada’s push to be a world leader in the fight against climate change may be hampered by its distinction for producing the most greenhouse gas emissions per person among the world’s 20 largest economies.

POLL: Do you have a family doctor?

A new urgent care centre is set to open in Langford on… Continue reading

Most Read