Police seeing steady decrease in overtime costs

Victoria police are seeing a steady decrease in costs when it comes to the amount of overtime officers are wracking up in court.

Victoria police are seeing a steady decrease in costs when it comes to the amount of overtime officers are wracking up in court.

According to the 2015 annual police report, $117,510 was spent on court overtime in 2013, followed by $105,750 in 2014. Last year, the department spent $67,423.

The reason for the decrease, said Acting Chief Const. Del Manak, is due to better scheduling. Police have been working closely with the Crown to put processes in place for the amount of officers needed in court. Where possible, the court dates are also set when a member is on duty.

“In the past, sometimes you would have an assault or a serious stabbing and a lot of times all the officers were subpoenaed so they all have to go to court. Not everybody plays the same role in every single case,” said Manak. “Now there’s a bit more due diligence on the Crown’s part to look (and say) this officer really didn’t have a crucial role in this so I’m not going to call them in.”

Overtime in general is something police have been keeping a close eye on in recent years and a number of measures have been implemented in order to keep it under control. Between 2010 and 2014, police averaged $2.2 million a year in overtime. The budget request for 2016 is $1.9 million — a reduction of 22 per cent.

Manak is happy the numbers are trending in the right direction, but he’s left wondering what else the department can do to keep overtime down.

“I think it’s important that we apply fiscal scrutiny and are always looking at all line items of our budget,” said Manak, noting the amount of overtime officers put in during a work week depends on what’s happening on the street and the unit they work in. “It’s a significant driver of costs and we are doing our best to manage.”

The annual report highlights a number of successes and challenges police experienced in 2015. Last year, 11 police officers (five men and four women) were hired, along with nine auxiliary jail guards and eight civilians. The department received 290 resumes — the highest amount since 2012 when 337 people submitted resumes.

For the 10th year in a row, the department managed to stay within the annual budget of $48.8 million with a surplus of $500,000. The bulk of the budget goes to personnel costs at $41.9 million. Operating expenditures ate up $6.2 million of and capital funding was pegged at $1 million. Revenue amounted to $276,000.

This year, police have asked for a budget of $50.6 million. Victoria covers 85 per cent of the cost and Esquimalt picks up 14 per cent. The department has 344 full-time employees — 243 of whom are officers.

 

 

 

Just Posted

Second puppy killed by poisonous mushrooms in Victoria

Springer spaniel puppy died after consuming mushrooms in Fairfield neighbourhood

Western Speedway racing legend ‘The Flying Plumber’ turns 98

Dave Cooper recalls car crashes, his first win, and more

Esquimalt arson trial hears of feud with tenant before the fire

Wei Li charged with intentionally setting fire to a duplex he owned on Oct. 3, 2017

Driver charged in Central Saanich pedestrian’s death appears in court

Victim Kim Ward, 51, died on scene at the August 2018 crash

Nuisance tree will remain on perimeter of Fireman’s Park

Council re-affirm pledge to protecting healthy tree canopy

WATCH: Greater Victoria’s top stories of the day

A round-up of the day’s top stories

POLL: Do you think the day of the federal election should be a statutory holiday?

Increasing voter turnout has long been a goal of officials across the… Continue reading

Woman, 24, faces life-altering injuries after being dragged 4 blocks by vehicle in Vancouver

A gofundme account says the woman will have to undergo multiple complex surgeries

Fatal overdoses down by 33% in B.C., but carfentanil deaths continue to spike

Carfentanil, an illicit drug more powerful than fentanyl, causing more deaths than ever

Two RCMP vehicles vandalized in Duncan over long weekend

Local Mounties asking for help in finding culprits

A year after pot legalization in Canada, it’s a slow roll

It’s one year into Canada’s experiment in legal marijuana, and hundreds of legal pot shops have opened

ELECTION 2019: Climate strikes push environment to top of mind for federal leaders

Black Press Media presents a three-part series on three big election issues

Most Read