A rendering of the wastewater treatment plant, which is currently under construction at McLoughlin Point. (Contributed photo)

Saanich braces for higher sewer and water rates

Saanich residents will find out Monday whether their sewer bill could up go up by almost 11 per cent.

A recommendation before council calls for a preliminary hike of 10.7 per cent cent in sewer rates. If council confirms this rate following budget discussions next year, average homeowners will pay $497 for sewer in 2018, an increase largely linked to the current implementation of the regional wastewater treatment plan currently underway.

Local sewer charges include three components: a fixed component, a local Saanich component, and a regional component. While staff calls on council to maintain the fixed charge of $31, the regional component would increase $36 to $254. This increase would account for 75 per cent of the total increase of $48 per household, as currently proposed. Cost increases in local operations and infrastructure account for the rest.

Saanich residents have been bracing themselves for increases of this sort for some time, following last year’s approval of the $765 million wastewater treatment plant at McLoughlin Point, whose construction is now underway across parts of the region, including Saanich.

When completed, the $765-million federal, provincial and CRD-funded sewage treatment plant will provide seven municipalities in Greater Victoria with the region’s first tertiary wastewater treatment system.

Saanich’s 2017-2021 financial plan breathes this spirit.

“Sewer Utility expenditures during the next five years will be influenced by significantly increased CRD regional treatment system debt, and CRD regional treatment operating costs,” it reads.

Saanich home residents also face a two-per cent hike in water rates, with the average cost per household going from $451 to $459.

Valla Tinney said in a memo to council that both the sewer and water rates are preliminary. “If any significant changes have occurred requiring an adjustment to the preliminary budget, these would be communicated to [council] and any recommended adjustments to the utility rates would be considered,” she said. “It is rare that a mid-year rate adjustment is required.”

Earlier this fall, crews drilled holes in Saanich to test whether the local geology can accommodate the pipeline connecting the proposed treatment plant at Esquimalt’s McLoughlin Point with the future residual treatment facility at Saanich’s Hartland Landfill.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Undercover operation exposes prominent human trafficking problem in Greater Victoria

VicPD’s Operation No More took place in mid-June at a local hotel

Victoria man in custody after shooting in 100-block of Gorge Road East

The man is facing recommended charges including assault with a weapon

Langford approves permit for 124-unit mass timber building

Tallwood 1 to be completed by late 2021

Book stores in Victoria notice uptick in sales for anti-racism titles

White Fragility, How to be an Antiracist are among the best selling titles

‘This year is unlike any other’: Trudeau delivers Canada day address

Sophie Gregoire Trudeau and the Prime Minister release video celebrating the national holiday

Tsilhqot’in Nation demands meeting with feds on declining Fraser River chinook stocks

The Nation wants to partner with DFO to rebuild and recover the stocks

Gov. General honours Canadians for bravery, volunteer service

Five categories of winners presented on Canada Day

COVID-19: Should non-medical masks be mandatory in Canada?

New poll shows Canadians are divided on the rules around mandatory masks

‘A little bit scary for everybody’: Air passengers wary as new rules take effect

Masks or face coverings have been mandatory on flights since April 20

VIDEO: Prince William and Kate chat with B.C. hospital staff about COVID-19

Seven-minute video posted to Youtube on Canada Day

River centre says heavy rains could bring flooding to central, northeastern B.C.

Water levels are already unusually high and river banks can be extremely unstable

Campbell River’s defunct cruise ship terminal to undergo evaluation for future plans

With no cruise ship coming through, the $16million terminal has been a white elephant for over 13 years

Most Read