Saanich plans to phase out single use plastic bags following committee review

Saanich plans to stuff plastic bags

Two committees will now review the proposed ban prior to council consideration

Saanich is moving towards banning single-use plastic bags.

“This is an important step,” said Coun. Susan Brice, before council voted to send a bylaw to said effect to two committees for review prior to council consideration. “It is certainly not the end. It is the beginning of a dialogue and an engagement that will have to involve the greater community, because that what [Capital Regional District] staff found has been successful in other cities where there has been broad buy-in and broad engagement from all the stakeholders.”

Saanich’s proposed bylaw which envisions phasing out plastic bags will now go before to the environment and natural areas advisory committee, as well as the planning, transportation and economic development advisory committee for input and public engagement.

Brice — who had tabled a notice a motion last month – said interest in banning single-use plastic bags has been building for many years across the Greater Victoria region thanks to the work of students like Charlotte Brady and Anastasia Castro of Glenlyon Norfolk School who have been pushing for such a ban. In a way, the proposed ban builds on the “exemplary work” of retailers, who have been trying to “wean” the public off this “handy, but environmentally deleterious” product.

Brice’s colleagues praised her efforts in citing the various environmental harm that plastic bags cause.

“This is not draconian,” said Coun. Colin Plant, pointing to various exemptions. “This is a step in the right direction.”

Coun. Fred Haynes praised the proposed ban, but added that he would like to see Saanich go further in eventually eliminating said exemptions. The model bylaw — that will be the basis of Saanich’s bylaw — allows plastic bags for the hygenic storage of bulk items such as fruit, vegetables and nuts, as well as frozen foods, meat or fish.

Historically, merchants used to wrap food in paper, said Haynes. “That’s an appropriate way to go in the future, but we aren’t ready yet,” he said.

The report also fails to address other kinds of plastics. “Eventually, they will come,” he said.

Coun. Dean Murdock and Coun. Judy Brownoff meanwhile predicted that Saanich’s move will send an example for other communities to follow.

The time-frame of Saanich’s move remains uncertain. Plant hoped that Saanich council could approve the ban by end of its term.

Just Posted

VicPD catches impaired driver near elementary school

Citizens alerted police to driver near James Bay Community School

Victoria’s Belfry Theatre hosts its first ‘relaxed performance’ for a diverse audience

Performance of Every Brilliant Thing is first to pilot the option

Car crash at Quadra and Finalyson Streets affects Saturday traffic

VicPD and the Victoria Fire Department responded

VIDEO: B.C. couple creates three-storey ‘doggie mansion’ for their five pups

Group of seven, who Kylee Ryan has dubbed as the ‘wandering paws,’ have a neat setup in Jade City

MacKinnon powers Avs to 5-4 OT win over Canucks

Vancouver battled back late to pick up single point

Port Alberni mom takes school district to court over Indigenous smudging, prayer in class

Candice Servatius, who is an evangelical Christian, is suing School District 70

Family of B.C. man killed in hit-and-run plead for tips, one year later

Cameron Kerr’s family says the driver and passengers tried to cover their tracks

Princeton couple pays for dream vacation with 840,000 grocery store points

It’s easy if you know what you are doing, they say

Chilliwack family’s dog missing after using online pet-sitting service

Frankie the pit bull bolted and hit by a car shortly after drop off through Rover.com

B.C. wildlife experts urge hunters to switch ammo to stop lead poisoning in birds

OWL, in Delta, is currently treating two eagles for lead poisoning

B.C. First Nations drop out of court challenge, sign deals with Trans Mountain

Upper Nicola Band says deal represents a ‘significant step forward’

Most Read