Neighbours Michelle Nicholls, Susan Hagedorn and May Leeper said they have met several times with representatives of Canopy, the operator of the large marijuana growing operation near their homes, but the odour problem remains. Dan Ferguson Langley Advance Times

Neighbours Michelle Nicholls, Susan Hagedorn and May Leeper said they have met several times with representatives of Canopy, the operator of the large marijuana growing operation near their homes, but the odour problem remains. Dan Ferguson Langley Advance Times

‘Smell that?’ Langley residents complain about marijuana greenhouse

MLAs send letter to federal attorney general and health minister urging crackdown

At the top of the hill overlooking the giant Canopy Growth marijuana greenhouse in Langley, Michelle Nicholls was explaining how the smell from the operation interferes with her enjoyment of her property when the wind shifted.

“Smell that?” Nicholls said, as a wave of the characteristic odour briefly washed over her and neighbours Susan Hagedorn and May Leeper.

“And this is a good day.”

Ever since the greenhouse began growing marijuana, the residents who live near the sprawling facility on zero avenue near 264 Street said they have been forced indoors at times because of the smell.

They said the odour was the worst when the weather was warm and the greenhouse is harvesting plants.

“It’s intense,” Hagedorn said.

Leeper said it is so bad on some days, they stay indoors.

“We go inside,” Leeper said.

“You close the doors and windows.”

Over months of talks with the company, a number of attempts have been made to reduce the smell by Canopy, but none have been especially effective, the residents said.

For awhile, the company was using what the residents called “misting cannons” to block the smell, but the neighbours said it didn’t make much difference.

On Sunday, they showed the Langley Advance Times what appeared to be a new misting system consisting of pipes running along the outside roof of the greenhouse.

They were not optimistic it will have much impact, and they welcomed word that Langley East MLA Rich Coleman, together with Delta South MLA Ian Paton, was calling for a federal crackdown, saying smelly marijuana greenhouses must either fix the problem or be closed down.

“I’m very thankful for Rich Coleman and Ian Paton for taking a stand for their constituents,” Hagedorn said.,

In a joint letter to federal Attorney General David Lametti and Health Minister Ginette Petitpas, the two Liberal MLAs said they are writing to “lodge a formal complaint” on behalf of their constituents about the “constant odour being emitted by licensed cannabis businesses in our riding.”

They argue that under the federal regulations, greenhouse operators who grow marijuana must do more to control odour emissions.

Coleman said the wording of the law is clear.

Under “good production practices” the regulations call for “a system that filters air to prevent the escape of odours.”

“The legislation says they have to control it [odours],” Coleman said.

“I want the law enforced.”

READ MORE: Aldergrove marijuana cultivation impacts quality of life for neighbours

READ MORE: Commercial cannabis dominates talk at Langley town hall

The letter lists four “locations in need of of immediate enforcement,” three in Delta and one in Langley, the large Canopy Growth greenhouse in Aldergrove near the Canada-U.S. border.

“We are requesting your immediate enforcement to ensure licensees comply with the conditions of their licence and ensure their facilities are ‘equipped with a system that filters air to prevent the escape of odours.’ If they fail to comply, appropriate fines and closure must be enforced.”

“It’s frustrating,” Coleman said.

“These poor people in the area are being disenfranchised from their homes [because of the smell].”

Coleman thinks no new permits for marijuana greenhouses should be issued until the problem has been solved.

“We should take a pause,” Coleman said.

“Somewhere, we have to find a way [ to eliminate odours]”

Langley Advance Times has reached out to Canopy for comment.

When the issue of the smell from the Aldergrove facility first arose, a spokesman for the company acknowledged that “we need to find a solution to that and have already taken some steps to address the issue.”

Those steps included equipment that releases a fine, scented mist which is then dispersed by high powered fans, something people who live nearby said was not effective.

While the region near Canopy hasn’t been part of his riding since redistribution, Coleman said the problem affects everyone who lives in agricultural areas.

Coleman also noted Glen Valley residents have expressed concern about a greenhouse scheduled to open soon in their area.

The building site is across the street from the Blaauw Eco Forest, with its endangered species and fragile bog environments.

At a Langley Township town hall meeting last month, several Glen Valley residents expressed concern about several issues ranging from odour and excessive nighttime light to the possible impact of water use on the local aquifer.

Mayor Jack Froese told the meeting that under existing laws, the Township can’t ban cannabis growing.

The three Delta locations cited in the letter from Coleman and Paton are Rubicon Organics on 104th Street, Canopy Growth on Hornby Drive and Emerald Health Cannabis on 80th Street.

_________________________________

Is there more to this story?

Email: dan.ferguson@langleyadvancetimes.com

Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter

_________________________________

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Neighbours Michelle Nicholls, Susan Hagedorn and May Leeper said they have met several times with representatives of Canopy, the operator of the large marijuana growing operation near their homes, but the odour problem remains. Dan Ferguson Langley Advance Times

Neighbours Michelle Nicholls, Susan Hagedorn and May Leeper said they have met several times with representatives of Canopy, the operator of the large marijuana growing operation near their homes, but the odour problem remains. Dan Ferguson Langley Advance Times

Just Posted

A report by investigator Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond found “widespread systemic racism against Indigenous people” in a report released Monday.
Peninsula hospital one where ‘significant work underway’

Investigation finds ‘widespread systemic racism against Indigenous people’ in provincial health care

Victoria police issued tickets to two Victoria party hosts Saturday night, according to VicPD Chief Del Manak. (Unsplash)
Victoria partiers hid in closets, bedrooms in an attempt to avoid fines

Police gave out COVID-19 tickets to two separate parties

(Courtesy of West Shore RCMP)
Second driver facing impaired charges after View Royal traffic stop leads to loaded firearms

West Shore RCMP stop swerving motorist and Saanich woman who came to pick her up

Sig
Highway 14 down to one-lane near Jordan River

Traffic on Highway 14, six kilometres east of Jordan River, is reduced… Continue reading

Classes are cancelled at Royal Bay Secondary School and other schools Nov. 30 due to power outages. (Black Press Media file photo)
Classes cancelled across the West Shore, Sooke due to power outages

Students can be picked up but facilities remain open

A B.C. Ambulance Service paramedic wearing a face mask to curb the spread of COVID-19 moves a stretcher outside an ambulance at Royal Columbia Hospital, in New Westminster, B.C., on Sunday, November 29, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C. records deadliest weekend of COVID-19 pandemic with 46 deaths; more than 2,300 cases

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry provides COVID-19 update

Black Press Media and BraveFace have come together to support children facing life-threatening conditions. Net proceeds from these washable, reusable, three-layer masks go to Make-A-Wish Foundation BC & Yukon.
Put on a BraveFace: Help make children’s wishes come true

Black Press Media, BraveFace host mask fundraiser for Make-A-Wish Foundation

Christy Jordan-Fenton is the co-author of the book Fatty Legs, which has been mentioned amid the controversy of an Abbotsford school assignment on residential schools.
Fatty Legs co-author responds to Abbotsford class assignment on residential schools

Children’s book mentioned amid controversy at W. A. Fraser Middle School

Kootenay East MLA Tom Shypitka takes over as energy and mines critic for the B.C. Liberal opposition. Kelowna-Lake Country MLA Norm Letnick (right) moves from health critic to assistant deputy speaker. (Hansard TV)
B.C. Liberals pick critics to take on Horgan’s NDP majority

Interim leader Shirley Bond takes seniors, long-term care

Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance Chrystia Freeland listens to a question from a reporter on the phone during a news conference in Ottawa, Monday, Nov. 30, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Spending too little worse than spending too much, Freeland says as Canada’s deficit tops $381B

‘The risk of providing too little support now outweighs that of providing too much’

Left to right: A screenshot of NTC nurse navigator Lesley Cerney, FNHA regional mental health manager Georjeana Paterson and Island Health’s medical health officer Dr. Charmaine Enns addressing Ehattesaht community members from Ehatis reserve in a Facebook live update. (Ehattesaht First Nation/Facebook)
Medical team sent to Ehatis reserve near Zeballos to guide community through COVID outbreak

17 cases, eight recoveries and no hospitalizations as Island Health praises First Nation’s response

Still from a video surveillance camera of a man alleged to have stolen from several people at knife-point in Chilliwack (Rosedale) early on Nov. 28, 2020. (Facebook)
B.C. man defends his family against intruder, saves neighbour while wielding hockey stick

RCMP looking for footage that captures violent crime spree in Chilliwack

Harbour seals rest on log booms at Flavelle Mill in Port Hardy. With recent announcements the mill will be getting rid of the log booms, Dr. David Rosen sees an opportunity to study how the disappearance of this highly-frequented refuge for the seals will alter their behaviour in Burrard Inlet. (Photo supplied by David Rosen)
What the heck is going on with marine mamals in Vancouver waterways?

UBC researcher asks why they’re returning, and what role we’re playing

Jim Neufeld, 55, was last seen leaving his home in Penticton Jan. 21, 2009. (RCMP photo)
Human remains found off U.S. coast in 2009 identified as Penticton man

Jim Neufeld, 55, was last seen leaving his home in Penticton Jan. 21, 2009

Most Read