Brad McRae has been relieved of his duties as chief operating officer of the City of Nanaimo. (News Bulletin file photo)

UPDATE: City of Nanaimo senior manager dismissed

Chief operations officer Brad McRae no longer employed by the city

The City of Nanaimo has dismissed one of its senior managers.

Brad McRae, Nanaimo’s chief operations officer, was relieved of his duties following a special council meeting on Wednesday. As an officer with the city, McRae was allowed to have a hearing in front of city councillors regarding any changes to his employment status and could not be dismissed without at least two-thirds majority vote by councillors, according to the community charter.

Tracy Samra, the city’s chief administrative officer, confirmed that the decision regarding McRae’s employment status was made yesterday, but became effective today.

“He has been on leave and now he is no longer with us,” Samra told the News Bulletin, adding that she could not elaborate on why McRae was dismissed due to privacy reasons.

McRae, who had been on medical leave since late November, was hired as the city’s chief operations officer in October 2016 after being lured away from the District of Lantzville, where he spent one year as chief administrative officer. Last year, McRae became in charge of public safety, following a series of restructuring decisions by the city.

Samra explained that McRae’s position was adjusted last September to remove public works and engineering responsibilities from his portfolio.

“Essentially his portfolio was public safety and I didn’t rename his title to director of public safety, I kept it as COO,” she said.

Samra said every decision she makes about staffing is done so in an objective manner and on the basis of what’s best for the city.

Coun. Jerry Hong said he couldn’t comment on McRae’s dismissal, explaining that McRae isn’t an employee of council.

“This is a human resources issue,” he said. “The only employee that council has discretion or authority over is our CAO.”

Hong said because of the way the community charter works, officers, such as McRae, have the right to come before council on issues related to termination.

“If Ms. Samra’s recommendation is to terminate, we as council, will support that,” he said. “If the choices were wrong then it is council’s job to deal with Ms. Samra.”

Karen Fry, Nanaimo Fire Rescue chief, will take on the role of director of public safety, according to Samra, who said she will make a good fit.

“I think she might stay on in this role,” Samra said. “She’s got really great leadership skills and training, so I am hopeful that she will stay on in that position.”

McRae declined to comment.


nicholas.pescod@nanaimobulletin.com

Like us on Facebook or follow Nicholas Pescod on Twitter

Just Posted

Rebirth of downtown cultural festival coming to Victoria in July

Folktoria aims to pick up where Folkfest left off

Plans rejigged for new Crystal Pool and Wellness Centre

Visitors to open house see plans for fitness facility, main pool with movable floor

Crash snarls traffic on Trans Canada at Tillicum

Southbound traffic on the Trans Canada Highway is at a crawl as… Continue reading

Saanich to study ‘mega mansions’ on farm land

District staff will study the siting of homes on agricultural lots

Marijuana to be legal in Canada Oct. 17: Trudeau

Prime Minister made the announcement during question period in the House of Commons

VIDEO: Victoria immigrant centre’s refugee housing lands in Oak Bay

Partnership project officially announced for World Refugee Day

FIFA World Cup weekly roundup

Host nation Russia remains unbeaten in Group A, tied with Uruguay

Scams separating Saanich residents from their money

Saanich Police warn residents of constantly evolving scams

Trudeau says he can’t imagine Trump damaging U.S. by imposing auto tariffs

New tariffs on Canadian autos entering the U.S. would amount to a self-inflicted wound on the U.S. economy

B.C. inmate gets 2 years in prison for assault on guard

Union rep said inmate sucker punched correctional officer, continued assault after officer fell

Temperature records broken across B.C., again

The first heat wave of the season went out with a bang across the province

Canada’s first national accessibility law tabled in Ottawa

The introduction of the Accessible Canada Act marked a key step towards greater inclusion

Police chief calls for mass casualty plan in Saskatchewan after Broncos crash

Former Saskatoon police chief Clive Weighill said the office was tasked with creating such a plan 13 years ago but none exists

U.S. schools mum on ties to doc in sex abuse inquiry

A now-dead doctor accused of sexual misconduct acted as a team physician at other universities

Most Read