Harry Charles Sadd, a 74-year-old former badminton coach, pleaded guilty to eight charges relating to sexual abuse that took place between 1970 and 1984. (RCMP handout)

Victims tell of abuse at hands of Victoria substitute teacher

Harry Charles Sadd pleaded guilty to eight charges that took place between 1970 to 1982

Editor’s Note: This story contains disturbing content.

A sentencing hearing for Harry Charles Sadd, 74, heard that the ex-badminton coach and teacher meets the criteria for pedophilic disorder, according to a psychiatric assessment.

Sadd pleaded guilty to eight charges relating to sexual abuse between the years of 1970 to 1982. A number of his victims, all young boys at the time of the abuse, were in court on Tuesday.

Sadd, whose wife was diabetic and became blind in the early years of their marriage, owned a painting company, in addition to substitute teaching in School Districts 61, 62 and 63.

The court heard how Sadd’s seven victims were between the ages of nine and 13 when the abuse first started, lasting in some cases for years.

RELATED: Former Greater Victoria badminton coach pleads guilty to 8 counts of sexual abuse

R.D., the first victim to come forward, met Sadd when he was nine years old. Sadd began sexually assaulting R.D. when his stepfather died, but the abuse stopped when R.D.’s family moved away for a year. When the family moved back to the Esquimalt area the abuse started again.

Sadd admits there were over 200 instances of sexual abuse after R.D. turned 12.

After R.D. went to police in 2016, a press release was issued asking for more victims to come forward, resulting in 23 new charges, some of which are still pending in the Supreme Court and are expected to be dealt with following this case.

R.D.’s victim impact statement, read out loud by Crown prosecutor Leslie Baskerville, spoke about the pain, stress and strain years of abuse put on his life, along with his wife and children. “Every time I see a Volvo … or smell strong tobacco … every time I watch sports … every time I see a blind person … every time I smell paint [ I’m reminded].”

RELATED: Victoria man charged in historical sexual assaults granted bail

When R.D. would object, Sadd told him to stop “listening to his head and listen to his body,” which was aroused due to Sadd’s touching.

D.C., another young boy abused by Sadd, met him at church and was invited to Sadd’s apartment afterward and introduced him to alcohol. Sadd taught D.C. to drive with him seated on his lap or while he fondled D.C. from the passenger seat. The Sunday afternoon drives, coupled with sexual abuse, became a weekly routine until Sadd moved to Hinton, Alta. to teach full time. Sadd was expelled from the Alberta Teaching Association for allegedly committing sexual offences against three boys. The allegations were dealt with in a tribunal, but not in a court of law.

D.C. read his victim impact statement in court and spoke about the impact the abuse had not only on him, but on his mother who was “devastated and rocked to her core” to learn about the abuse that had been hidden for years. D.C. spoke about the guilt he feels, not having come forward earlier. “How many could have been saved if I had done my part? I’m not to blame but I carry the burden.”

The court heard how the abuse took place in communal showers after badminton practice, on camping trips in shared tents and during overnight tournaments.

The sentencing hearing is expected to continue on Wednesday.



kendra.crighton@blackpress.ca

Follow us on Instagram
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Police search for suspect in robbery at Saanich 7-11

Suspect told the cashier he was armed

Mount Douglas Park closed to vehicle traffic over long weekend

Saanich residents encouraged to explore parks in their neighbourhood on foot

VIDEO: B.C. singer creates frontline workers tribute song

Cambree Lovesy’s song saluting those battling COVID-19 draws interest online

Researchers to study whether plasma of recovered patients can treat COVID-19

Plasma is the liquid portion of the blood that contains the antibodies that protect against illness

Cowichan Valley man dies in single-vehicle collision

First responders called to Miller Road shortly after midnight on Thursday

B.C., Alberta health ministers urge public to stay home Easter weekend

Regional politicians, online petition calling for closure of provincial border to non-essential traffic

B.C.’s COVID-19 rent supplement starts taking applications

$300 to $500 to landlords for April, May and June if eligible

B.C. unveils $5M for mental health supports during the COVID-19 pandemic

Will include virtual clinics and resources for British Columbians, including front-line workers

B.C. First Nations Health Authority launches virtual doctor program

Program to provide primary health care through COVID-19 pandemic

UPDATE: Canadians awake to extra COVID-19 emergency benefit money, feds clarify changes

The CRA and federal officials are working to clarify the confusion around payments

Most Read