Local indie band, Bridal Party, took to social media on Monday to share an upsetting experience they had before a performance at Lucky Bar in downtown Victoria. (photo by Mats Schram)

Victoria-based band shares experience with racism outside Lucky Bar

The band posted about the incident on social media to highlight what’s happening in the city

Local indie band Bridal Party took to social media on Monday to share an upsetting experience they had before a performance at Lucky Bar in downtown Victoria.

View this post on Instagram

~*PLS READ*~ Last Saturday, while we were loading into Lucky Bar, a man passing by the alley yelled an anti-black slur at our friend (who prefers to remain anonymous). They’ve asked us to share what happened with the community to encourage the conversation about very real and ongoing racism in Victoria. It exists as explicit actions and macro aggressions, like yelling a racial slur, or as more covert expressions of racial prejudice, like a microaggression. Microagressions are everyday phrases or actions that discriminate against a minority group, often repeating stereotypes and affirming that the dominant culture in that space (white ppl) is what’s considered “normal”. Microaggressions can appear harmless and be hard to unmask, but they are still racism. (Definitions from Derald Wing Sue) So, let’s talk about it, and most importantly, let’s listen to the experiences of BIPOC in our community. This is a reminder for white ppl to be mindful of how much space we are taking up. It is important to increase representation at shows, and it is equally as important to ensure these spaces are actually inclusive and safe for BIPOC. What are the ways we can address racism in its many forms to make sure all of our friends feel safe and supported? This includes unpacking any buried prejudice within ourselves too. Read books by BIPOC authors and follow BIPOC accounts. We should be thinking about this and working on it every day.

A post shared by BRIDAL PARTY (@brydalparty) on

In a post on the band’s Instagram account, they explained that while loading their equipment into Lucky Bar before their Aug. 24 show, a man passed by and shouted an “anti-black slur” at a friend of the band.

The post went on to explain that the friend wanted to remain anonymous but that they also felt it was important to share what had happened “to encourage the conversation about very real and ongoing racism in Victoria.”

In the post, the band also referenced Derald Wing Sue, a psychology professor at Columbia University, and explained that microagressions such as everyday phrases or actions that perpetuate stereotypes can seem harmless and be difficult to spot, but are just as racist as macroagressions such as shouting racial slurs.

“Let’s talk about it, and most importantly, let’s listen to the experiences of BIPOC [Black and Indigenous People of Colour] in our community,” stated the post. “This is a reminder for white [people] to be mindful of how much space we are taking up.”

The band acknowledged the needs for representation at music shows and emphasized the importance of ensuring that these spaces aren’t just inclusive but safe for minority groups.

READ ALSO: Parents want more action after racist video posted by Vancouver high school student

At the end of the post, the band asked how racism can be addressed to make sure their friends feel safe.

“This includes unpacking any buried prejudice within ourselves too,” they wrote. “We should be thinking about this and working on it every day.”

The band received positive responses to the post.

“Thanks for sharing this you lovely humans. I’m really saddened that this happened. And I love that you’re using it as a means to create more important conversations,” wrote @rowanpoem.

The post was later edited to include a tip from a commenter, @ozelotmusic, who suggested reading books by “non-white folks,” and the band also recommended following people of colour on social media.


@devonscarlett
devon.bidal@saanichnews.com

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