Amy-Lynn Burian says she’s very proud of her daughter for making this pledge despite wanting grandchildren. (Kendra Crighton/News Staff)

Victoria teenager demands action of world leaders in face of climate crisis, pledges not to have children

200 young Canadians have taken the No Future No Children pledge

A lone figure in red, standing on the stairs of the B.C. Legislature might be a good analogy in the fight for action in the face of the climate crisis.

Emma-Jane Burian has pledged she won’t have kids, at least until the government begins to take serious action to ensure the safety of the climate.

The 17-year-old, home-school student has joined more than 200 young Canadians in the No Future, No Children pledge launched today by Climate Strike Canada.

RELATED: Victoria youth skip school for climate strike

Burian says the pledge is both an expression of fear and a plea for action that encompasses the fear and frustration felt by Canada’s youth.

Last year students world-wide began skipping school on Fridays to protest the inaction towards climate change, following the lead of Swedish activist Greta Thunberg. It was during this time that Burian started to think about her future and what she could do to affect change.

“As a 17-year-old, I should not have to worry about having or not having children — yet now, it has become my responsibility,” she says. “The adults are not adulting, when in fact this crisis is our responsibility.”

Burian is a lead organizer of the climate strikes in Victoria and works with the Climate Strike Canada’s B.C. team.

RELATED: Victoria Youth head to B.C. Legislature for climate strike

With the federal election around the corner, Burian says she hopes the pledge will influence candidates to have strong platforms when it comes to the climate crisis.

Burian and other student activists with Climate Strike Canada have compiled a list of seven areas which their demands focus on, including bold emission reduction targets, separation of oil and state, environmental and Indigenous rights, protection of vulnerable groups and conservation of biodiversity.

“We’re definitely not jumping the gun, in fact I would say this has may come too late,” says Burian.



kendra.crighton@blackpress.ca

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