Social Development Minister Shane Simpson announces poverty reduction committee chaired by Vancouver-Kensington MLA Mable Elmore (left) and Dawn Hemingway, chair of social work at University of Northern B.C., Oct. 30, 2017. The committee has 28 members and started with a budget of $1.2 million. (B.C. government)

Social Development Minister Shane Simpson announces poverty reduction committee chaired by Vancouver-Kensington MLA Mable Elmore (left) and Dawn Hemingway, chair of social work at University of Northern B.C., Oct. 30, 2017. The committee has 28 members and started with a budget of $1.2 million. (B.C. government)

B.C. VIEWS: Our poverty reduction plan is already in place

NDP has another promise it needs to appear to keep

B.C.’s poverty reduction plan has been delayed, leaving us the only province bereft of a government-created anti-poverty strategy for a few months more. This sombre news was delivered by Shane Simpson, social development minister for the NDP minority government, as consultation continued around the province.

The plan now is to release a “what we heard” report in June, and then bring in legislation in the fall. “The poverty reduction strategy will come after that,” says the government website.

The ministry has received dozens of submissions from “stakeholder” groups around the province, and community meetings continue. There is a weary familiarity to these submissions, such as the three (so far) from the B.C. Poverty Reduction Coalition.

Who’s that, you may ask. The backbone is of course public sector unions and union umbrella groups, including otherwise unknown outfits like “Streams of Justice” and “Protein for People.”

“First Call,” a core member whose name refers to your taxes, has a page devoted to the struggle against B.C. child labour, illustrated with a ridiculous staged picture of a sad boy of about eight pretending to operate an excavator.

Its key recommendations include increasing the minimum wage to $15 an hour, raising welfare rates and legislating targets to reduce B.C.’s poverty rate by 30 per cent within four years, and 70 per cent within 10 years.

This longer-term goal is to be accomplished by bringing in a universal $10-a-day child care program among other strategies. Sound familiar? The B.C. NDP campaigned tirelessly on these ideas over the past decade, and some submissions read like NDP campaign brochures from 2017 and years previous.

Indeed, the minimum wage policy is already in place. Welfare rates were raised as soon as the NDP minority took office, a long overdue step in that circumstance. We are assured the universal child care plan is underway, although Premier John Horgan has said the $10-a-day part was a slogan borrowed from those advocacy groups and not necessarily the rate.

The B.C. Green Party wants to go to a guaranteed minimum income system, instead of just imposing increases to the minimum wage that have been shown over and over to push low-wage employees out of work. (An obvious example is the self-serve kiosks being introduced in fast-food restaurants.)

The fatal flaw in these plans is that everyone be given a guaranteed “living wage” and then if they earn money, the dole is clawed back after a certain point. Ultra-progressive Finland recently announced it is abandoning its universal basic income experiment next year.

Why? It’s too expensive. Handing out guaranteed cash to everyone can only be financed by a huge tax increase, which increases tax avoidance the way cranking up minimum wages increases hiring avoidance.

Defining poverty isn’t easy. First Call scrapped its whole methodology a few years ago, after it was pointed out it used federal statistics that measure relative income inequality, something that would still exist if the minimum wage was raised to $50 an hour.

Last year there was a fuss about Richmond being identified as the Lower Mainland’s worst community for poverty, defined as after-tax income compared to average household needs. Critics suggested that the issue in booming Richmond may be under-reported income, given that it’s B.C.’s major centre for Asian satellite families.

There is another anti-poverty plan in place. It’s called market capitalism, and it’s worked everywhere it has been tried, perhaps most noticeably in China. Globally, in the last two decades alone, extreme poverty has been reduced by nearly half.

Tom Fletcher is B.C. legislature reporter and columnist for Black Press. Email: tfletcher@blackpress.ca


@tomfletcherbc
tfletcher@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

BC legislaturePoverty reduction

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

A video captured by Twitter user Teddy Jenner of a fire in Beacon Hill Park the night of Jan. 21, 2021. (Twitter/@OfftheCrosseBar)
Victoria police say no injuries after tent fire in Beacon Hill Park

Emergency crews responded to fire Thursday evening

There are many options for enjoying a meal out locally during Dine Around and Stay in Town, on now through Feb. 7. (10 Acres Commons)
Dine Around Stay in Town Victoria carries added importance during pandemic

Special menu items for eat in or takeout/delivery, staycation deals available through Feb. 7

Central Saanich installed a temporary portable along Lochside Trail near Michell’s Farm Market and remains in discussion with the Capital Regional District about finding what Mayor Ryan Windsor called a ‘permanent solution’ to ensuring washroom access at the popular location. (Wolf Depner/News Staff)
Central Saanich in talks with CRD about ‘permanent’ washroom facility near Lochside Trail

The municipality installed a temporary portable washroom near Michell’s Farm Market last week

(Black Press Media file photo)
Bylaw officers called to Saanich park for COVID-19 protocol violations on pickleball court

Raquet sport players reminded to avoid doubles play amid pandemic

Victoria police say a missing teen has been located safe. (Black Press Media file photo)
Missing teen located safe: Victoria police

Missing person alert ended for high-risk missing 14-year-old

Businesses continue to struggle under COVID-19 restrictions as the pandemic reaches the one-year mark. (B.C. government)
Another 564 COVID-19 cases, mass vaccine plan coming Friday

15 more deaths, community cluster declared in Williams Lake

Anyone with information on any of these individuals is asked to call 1-800-222-TIPS (8477) or visit the website victoriacrimestoppers.ca for more information.
Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers wanted list for the week of Jan. 19

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

A specialized RCMP team is investigating a suspicious trailer, which might have connections to the illicit drug trade, found abandoned outside a Cache Creek motel. (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> files)
Police probe U-Haul trailer linked to illicit drugs left outside Cache Creek motel

Hazardous materials found inside believed to be consistent with the production of illicit drugs

Premier John Horgan leaves the podium following his first press conference of the year as he comments on various questions from the media in the Press Gallery at B.C. Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Monday, January 13, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
Interprovincial travel restrictions a no-go, Horgan says after reviewing legal options

The B.C. NDP government sought legal advice as concerns of travel continue

Gem Lake Top, at Big White Ski Resort, seen at Jan. 8. (Big White Ski Resort)
Big White cancels $7.3M in lift tickets, accommodations due to COVID-19 orders

Since November, the ski resort has been forced to make several changes

Darlene Curylo scratched a $3M ticket, BCLC’s largest ever scratch and win prize. (BCLC)
Kelowna woman in shock after winning BCLC’s largest-ever instant-ticket prize

Darlene Curylo couldn’t believe her eyes when she saw the amount of money she’d won from a scratch ticket

While each person has different reasons for becoming homeless, a UBCO study shows they learn through their interactions with different services to perform ‘as homeless’ based on the expectations of service providers. (Contributed)
Kelowna homeless forced to ‘perform’ for resources, says UBCO study

One participant in the study said ‘It is about looking homeless, but not too homeless’

Aquaculture employee from Vancouver Island, Michelle, poses with a comment that she received on social media. Facebook group Women in Canadian Salmon Farming started an online campaign #enoughisenough to highlight the harassment they were facing online after debates about Discovery Islands fish farms intensified on social media. (Submitted photo)
Female aquaculture employees report online bullying, say divisive debate has turned sexist

Vancouver Island’s female aquaculture employees start #enoughisenough to address misogynistic comments aimed at them

Most Read