Canadian’s shame over Syria is misplaced

Many other global hotspots require Canada's support as well as Syria

Re: Children victimized in Syrian civil war (Letters, Oct. 12)

I must reject Rachelle Dallaire’s naive postulation concerning the obligation of Canada’s government and media with regard to the plight of children in war-torn Syria.

In proclaiming to be “ashamed to be Canadian” because not enough is being done, she clearly shows that she has her head buried in the sand and is ignoring that there are millions of disabled, sick and starving people in many other parts of the world (including Canada) with equal claim to our attentions and support.

As in most things, there have to be priorities and working with these is the only way to progress and succeed, rather than chasing around the globe like headless chickens, trying to save the whole world at a stroke.

There is only so much that governments and international aid organizations can achieve and it is abundantly clear that they are doing everything possible within the limits placed upon them.

For example, to reach the wretched people (children and adults) whose lives are being devastated in the Middle East, the problems are often not just a matter of enthusiasm, funding and logistics on the part of the givers, but rather the integrity, goodwill and trust at the receiving end. If  peacekeeping forces cannot secure safe passage in those countries, then what chance is there for anyone else.

Finally, I suggest it is nonsense to lambast the media for not pleading the plight of Syria’s children.

Their job is to report the facts so that we, as well as the likes of Stephen Harper, are moved to support the multitude of amazing people around the world who are already doing,  in an organized and effective way, what Ms. Dallaire craves.

I fear the lady’s “shame” is both misplaced and misleading.

Derrick Johns

Oak Bay

Just Posted

Sentencing delayed for man who attacked VicPD dog

Uno later recovered from his injury and returned to work

Police ask for public’s help in locating Johnny Sam

Sam was last seen on April 17 in Esquimalt

Eco warriors to shut down Douglas Street on Earth Day

Environmentalists to call on banks to divert investments into green infrastructure

Fire damage to Esquimalt building leaves some tenants out for at least six months

Structural damage has barred half of the tenants from returning, while others might move back sooner

Plans to clear-cut old-growth near Port Renfrew causes an environmental outcry

Groups call logging a provincial government ‘blind spot’

It was no Kentucky Derby: B.C. girls host foot-long snail race

Two Grade 3 students in White Rock put four snails to the test in a hotly-contested street race

POLL: How often does your family use BC Ferries?

Navigating the lineups for BC Ferries is a way of life for… Continue reading

Crime Stoppers most wanted for Greater Victoria for the week of April 16

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

Man airlifted to hospital after apparent hunting incident in East Kootenay

The man was in stable condition when he was flown out of Fairmont Hot Springs to a Calgary hospital

Police probe eight fires set at B.C. elementary school

Nanaimo RCMP say fires appear to have been set intentionally

Inquest into Port Hardy police shooting moved to Campbell River

Family disappointed James Hayward coroner’s inquest rescheduled hours away

Undercover cops don’t need warrant to email, text suspected child lurers: court

High court decision came Thursday in the case of Sean Patrick Mills of Newfoundland

Whitecaps fans stage walkout over club’s response to allegations against B.C. coach

Soccer coach has been suspended by Coastal FC since February

Most Read