EDITORIAL: Council stalling on parking

You really cannot blame a few of the councillors in North Saanich for not wanting a 16-page bylaw on traffic and parking matters

You really cannot blame a few of the councillors in the District of North Saanich for not wanting a 16-page bylaw on traffic and parking matters.

After all, plenty of the regulations within the document do not apply to the community and that level and amount of rules would make it hard for council to adjudicate concerns that arise from it.

That’s especially true for a council that seems to want to be in the middle of most debates and conflicts that their staff could easily handle, given clear direction and then a little bit of trust from the politicians.

Council is asking staff to reduce the size of the bylaw. Councillor Dunstan Browne even suggested the bylaw could be a single small paragraph — one that deals with only one specific parking issue in North Saanich.

Councillor Celia Stock has it right, however, when she calls for a document that can handle a variety of issues. As long as they are relevant issues, certainly, but more than just a single issue.

Stock sees the potential for change in North Saanich and she appears to want at least one bylaw in place that can deal with matters that right now might be unforeseen.

Isn’t that one small aspect of proper planning — thinking ahead?

There are an estimated 300 to 360 planned development units on the books at North Saanich municipal hall. That doesn’t include any other plans that have yet come into the district.

Those potential residential areas represent an impact on parking and traffic in North Saanich and that means, to some extent, conflict between neighbours.

It would be prudent for the municipality to have a bylaw in place now, in anticipation of growth. Stock is obviously quite passionate about parking issues and is urging council to be professional and to prepare for change.

Browne, during debate on June 3, said council’s business is not to make laws but to “regulate the community.”

He’s half-right. Council’s job, first and foremost, is to look out for the safety of residents in the community they serve. Doing so means having bylaws in place to set out the rules so everyone knows where the goalposts are.

Yes, have a bylaw that makes sense for North Saanich. Do not, however, shirk the responsibilities of an elected body to protect its constituents.

 

Just Posted

Victoria teen killed on field trip near Sooke

Second youth also injured in falling tree incident at Camp Barnard

Oak Bay double murder trial: Blood splatter analyst says no shoe prints found in unit

RCMP analyst testifies to smears, fingermarks, ‘swipe and wipe’ patterns around apartment

Victoria one of five B.C. cities to launch new youth volunteer program

Youth 20/20 Can gives young Canadians volunteer opportunities

Scorpion gives birth at Victoria Bug Zoo after hitching ride in woman’s luggage

A Vancouver woman inadvertently brought the animal home from a trip to Cuba

Saanich filmmaker wins award at Indigenous awards in Calgary

Barbara Todd Hager took home the 2019 Inspire Arts Award

VIDEO: ‘Avengers: Endgame’ to be re-released with new footage

‘Avatar’ holds global box office record at $2.788 billion, while ‘Endgame’ stands at $2.743 billion…

Greater Victoria wanted list for the week of June 18

Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers is seeking the public’s help in locating the… Continue reading

POLL: Do you support the government’s decision to approve the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion?

The federal government announced Tuesday its approval for the Trans Mountain pipeline… Continue reading

Commercial fishers in B.C. now required to wear life-jackets on deck: WorkSafeBC

WorkSafeBC reports 24 work-related deaths in the commercial fishing industry between 2007 and 2018

Beekeeping Rossland boy finds human kindness sweet as honey

Family overwhelmed by kind offerings of strangers

B.C. files second legal challenge against Alberta over turn-off-taps law

B.C. government filed a second lawsuit against Alberta on June 14

Tax credits, penalizing big polluters, key to Conservative climate plan

Canada’s commitment is to cut emissions to 70 per cent of what they were in 2005 before 2030

Comox Samaritan covers bear with blanket, gets a big surprise

Conservation officer says person lucky after animal hit by car in record year for bear encounters

Elias Pettersson wins Calder Trophy as NHL’s top rookie

Vancouver forward first Canuck to win award since Pavel Bure in 1992

Most Read